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Skipping Rope Doesn't Skip Workout

When was the last time you jumped rope? It's cheap and portable – and burns more calories than you might think. Give it a whirl!
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What piece of exercise equipment sells for under $20, fits into a briefcase, can be used by the whole family, and improves cardiovascular fitness while toning muscle at the same time? And using it for just 15-20 minutes will burn off the calories from a candy bar? The answer: a jump rope.

Jumping rope is a great calorie-burner. You'd have to run an eight-minute mile to work off more calories than you'd burn jumping rope. Use the WebMD Calorie Counter to figure out how many calories you'll burn for a given activity, based on your weight and the duration of exercise

jumping rope

"It's certainly good for the heart," says Peter Schulman, MD, associate professor, Cardiology/Pulmonary Medicine, University of Connecticut Health Center in Farmington. "It strengthens the upper and lower body and burns a lot of calories in a short time, but other considerations will determine if it's appropriate for an individual."

He sees rope-jumping as something fit adults can use to add spice to their exercise routine. "You're putting direct stress on knees, ankles, and hips, but if done properly it's a lower-impact activity than jogging."

Basic Requirements

For novices, a beaded rope is recommended because it holds its shape and is easier to control than a lightweight cloth or vinyl rope.

  • Adjust the rope by holding the handles and stepping on the rope.
  • Shorten the rope so the handles reach your armpits.
  • Wear properly fitted athletic shoes, preferably cross-training shoes.

You'll need a four-by-six-foot area, and about 10 inches of space above your head. The exercise surface is very important. Do not attempt to jump on carpet, grass, concrete, or asphalt. While carpet reduces impact, the downside is it grabs your shoes and can twist your ankle or knee. Use a wood floor, piece of plywood, or an impact mat made for exercise.

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