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Sept. 20, 2000 (Toronto) -- Americans seeking a healthy diet are eating more farm-fresh fruits and vegetables then ever before -- but the downside is an increase in foodborne illness. Pregnant women and people with immune problems are at particularly high risk, according to a CDC report presented here at an international gathering of infectious disease specialists.

"Foodborne illness outbreaks have tripled since the 1970s," warns Cindy Friedman, MD, a medical epidemiologist at the CDC's division of foodborne and diarrheal diseases. "Bacterial causes are most common, particularly salmonella, cyclospora, E. coli, and cryptosporidium."

Not only have the number of outbreaks tripled -- to more than 10 outbreaks per year during the 1990s -- but the size of each outbreak is much larger. The average size of each outbreak was four illnesses in the '70s, but this increased to 40 illnesses per outbreak in the '90s.

"Patients are mainly women age 20 to 40 years -- a demographic usually associated with fresh-produce eaters," Friedman says. "There is nothing to suggest any difference between domestic and imported produce -- there have been outbreaks with both."

The worst culprits are sprouts -- especially alfalfa sprouts -- and fresh apple and orange juices. With sprouts, the problem is that the same process that makes the sprout grow also encourages massive growth of any germs. Fruit juices -- unless they are pasteurized -- are perfect breeding grounds for germs, which can multiply even when the juice is properly refrigerated.

"Consumers need to be aware that if you take fruit and wash it under tap water, it will reduce but not eliminate contamination," Friedman says. "New products to wash fruit also reduce -- but don't eliminate -- your risk. That's what consumers need to know."

Foodborne diseases can be dangerous, and infected people often must be hospitalized. The risk is even greater for unborn children and for people with compromised immune systems.

"High-risk individuals -- for example, pregnant women like me -- should avoid sprouts and raw juice," Friedman urges. "It's really important for consumers to find out and be aware of where the juice they drink came from."

It's not usually obvious when produce is contaminated. For example, a recent large outbreak was traced to mangos -- a fruit that is peeled before being eaten. Investigation showed that the mangos absorbed contaminated water through their stem scars during washing on the Brazilian farm where they were grown. Similarly, another recent outbreak in Connecticut and Illinois was traced to California mesclun lettuce that was washed with contaminated water.

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