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Magazine Article Lists Organic Items Worthy of Your Shopping Cart

Jan. 10, 2006 -- Pondering the purchase of organic foods? A story in Consumer Reports spells out which organic items are worth buying -- and which aren't.

Here is the list, which appears in the magazine's February edition:

Organic items worth buying as often as possible: Apples, baby food, bell peppers, celery, cherries, dairy, eggs, imported grapes, meat, nectarines, peaches, pears, poultry, potatoes, red raspberries, spinach, and strawberries.

Organic items worth buying if money is no object: Asparagus, avocados, bananas, bread, broccoli, cauliflower, cereals, sweet corn, kiwi, mangos, oils, onions, papaya, pasta, pineapples, potato chips, and sweet peas. Also included are packaged products such as canned vegetables and dried fruit.

Organic items not worth buying: Seafood and cosmetics.

Expect to pay more for organic foods, which are more labor-intensive to grow and don't get government subsidies, states the article.

Magazine's Standards

When Consumer Reports drew up those lists, they considered government standards for organic foods and residues of pesticides, antibiotics, or hormones used in raising nonorganic foods. The article doesn't focus on environmental issues.

Why did seafood and cosmetics fare poorly?

Consumer Reports notes that the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) hasn't set standards for organic seafood, and wild and farmed seafood can be labeled "organic" even if they contain contaminants such as mercury and PCBs.

As for cosmetics, the article states that products typically contain a mix of ingredients that didn't necessarily come from organic agriculture.

What About Cost?

Organic foods are often more expensive than nonorganic foods. "On average, you'll pay 50% extra for organic food, but you can easily end up shelling out 100% more, especially for milk and meat," states Consumer Reports.

The article offers these ideas to cut costs of organic foods:

  • Comparison shop
  • Buy locally produced organic foods (check farmers' markets)
  • Buy a share in a community-supported organic farm to get a regular supply of seasonal organic produce
  • Order by mail

Consumer Reports also recommends checking that fresh organic fruits and vegetables aren't placed too close to nonorganic produce in grocery stores, since misting could let pesticide residue run.

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