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5 much maligned foods are making a nutritional comeback.

When a good food goes bad, can it ever make good again? The answer seems to be yes.

Many of our favorite foods that nutrition experts once warned us against eating for the sake of our health are now making a comeback and may deserve a spot at your next meal.

These nutritional underdogs may have gotten a bad rap in the past, but new research shows that they may not be bad for you as once thought. In fact, they may even be better for you than what you're eating now.

Dark Meat: It's the New White

White meat chicken breasts have been the mantra for health-conscious carnivores for years, but now experts say you shouldn't feel guilty about wanting to go over to the dark side.

Boneless, skinless chicken thighs are often a cheaper and tastier alternative to chicken breasts and only contain marginally more fat and calories than white meat.

"You're getting some nutritional pluses with dark meat too," says registered dietitian Joan Carter, an instructor at the Children's Nutrition Research Center at Baylor University. "It's moister, because it is a little higher in fat. But it also has more flavor and iron because that's what makes that meat dark."

The important thing is to take the skin off, where most of the fat in poultry lies.

Carter also says that today's pork really is the other white meat and has much less fat than in years past.

"Pork tenderloin is now a low-fat meat and should not be vilified as it was at one time," says Carter.

Lean cuts of beef, such as flank steak, have also become even leaner in recent years, but fatty cuts like rib eye steaks with visible marbling (i.e. fat) should still be reserved for only special occasions.

Margarine vs. Butter: Which is Better?

First came butter, and it was good, very good. When more economical margarine came along, butter became bad. But butter lovers were redeemed when the news came that margarines were high in a new type of artery-clogging fat called trans fat. Yet butter appears to be falling from nutritional favor again.

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