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Spring Vegetable Guide

How to choose the best vegetables for the spring season.

WebMD Feature from "EatingWell"

Spring Vegetable GuideSpring-fresh and nutrient-packed artichokes, asparagus, peas and salad greens are in season now. This handy guide offers information on picking the best spring vegetables and the health benefits of each.

Artichokes

Italians have a deep attachment to the artichoke, which is native to the Mediterranean and first appeared in modern records in Naples around 1400. When spring rolls around in Rome, artichokes are served every way possible, from deep-fried to thinly sliced raw and topped with shaved pecorino and fruity olive oil. Then when the season is over, frozen and canned artichokes are definitely convenient, making artichokes a great addition to weeknight meals and quick dips.

What You Get: Plenty of fiber and a good amount of vitamin C, potassium and folate make artichokes an obvious healthy choice.

Shopping Tip: Look for green, plump, compact heads. Brown spots on the scales may be unattractive but indicate that the artichokes have been frost-kissed and have improved flavor.

Storage Tip: Refrigerate in a plastic bag for up to 1 week.

Asparagus

King Louis XIV of France was so fond of asparagus he ordered greenhouses to grow the delicacy year-round. Today, you don’t need to be royalty to enjoy it anytime, but it is the freshest and tastiest in spring.

What You Get: One stalk of asparagus contains just 4 calories and delivers healthy doses of folate, potassium and fiber.

Shopping Tips: Consumers who choose spindly asparagus are actually missing the juicy tenderness of fatter, more robust spears. "Elegantly thin" asparagus is less sweet, more grassy and herbaceous. Shun any spear that appears shriveled or whose bud is spreading open.

Storage Tip: If you’re not going to eat your asparagus within a day or two, stand it upright in a glass of water to keep it hydrated.

Peas

Only about 5 percent of the peas grown in the world are actually eaten fresh—most are frozen or canned. Do your part to boost the statistics by indulging in fresh spring peas—snap, snow or English shelling. Choose snow peas or snap peas if you’re looking for the tasty edible pods to throw in a salad or to simply sauté and choose shelling varieties for the fun-to-open pods full of little green gems.

What You Get: Bursting with nutrients, peas are a very good source of vitamin K, manganese, vitamin C, iron, fiber, vitamin B1 and folate, as well as a good source of a host of other vitamins and minerals.

Shopping Tip: Look for peas with light, bright coloring without any brown, bruised, withering ends.

Storage Tip: Refrigerate peas for 2 to 4 days.

Salad Greens

Salads using fresh, seasonal greens are an ideal way to get dinner on the table fast without spending much time in front of the stove. Sandwiches are good places for greens too: try watercress on a tuna salad sandwich or arugula on a grilled vegetable sandwich.

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