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Food-borne illnesses are no picnic, so prepare your food the proper way

It's the season for frolicking in the sun during family barbecues and for romantic picnics. At some point this summer, most of us will find ourselves flipping burgers on the grill or whipping out our Tupperware to transport a bin of potato salad. But unfortunately, if you aren't careful with foods during cookouts, natural bacteria can grow and multiply, putting you at risk for food-borne illnesses with scary names like salmonella and staphylococcus.

It's no picnic when a food-related illness strikes, often resulting in diarrhea, vomiting, and in some cases severe dehydration. Unfortunately, most of us will experience food poisoning at some point in our lives. According to the CDC, there are 76 million cases of food-borne illness each year in the U.S., which includes 325,000 hospitalizations and 5,000 deaths.

With evidence that food-borne illnesses may be more common during warm weather, people need to take extra precautions during the summer months, says Amy DuBois, MD, MPH, FACS, from the CDC in Atlanta.

An Ounce of Prevention

Given that food poisoning is often caused by our own safety mistakes, preventing food-borne illnesses while enjoying meals outdoors is often in your hands, literally.

With the help of two food safety experts who spoke to WebMD -- DuBois, and Peter J. Slade, PhD, director of the National Center for Food Safety and Technology in Summit-Argo, Ill. -- we've come up with a list of rules so you can have your picnic and safely eat it, too.

1) Keep your hands clean.

"Hand washing really covers a multitude of sins," DuBois tells WebMD. In fact, dirty hands are one of the most common ways foods get contaminated. "You don't necessarily have control over where your food came from, but you can always make sure that you wash your hands." This includes washing your hands after changing diapers or going to the bathroom and before you eat or handle foods.

When you are outside without a water source, DuBois recommends using antibacterial hand wipes and gels, which are very effective when used correctly. Use soap and water to wash your hands, however, before and after handling raw meat or poultry.

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