Find Information About:

Drugs & Supplements

Get information and reviews on prescription drugs, over-the-counter medications, vitamins, and supplements. Search by name or medical condition.

Pill Identifier

Pill Identifier

Having trouble identifying your pills?

Enter the shape, color, or imprint of your prescription or OTC drug. Our pill identification tool will display pictures that you can compare to your pill.

Get Started

My Medicine

Save your medicine, check interactions, sign up for FDA alerts, create family profiles and more.

Get Started

WebMD Health Experts and Community

Talk to health experts and other people like you in WebMD's Communities. It's a safe forum where you can create or participate in support groups and discussions about health topics that interest you.

  • Second Opinion

    Second Opinion

    Read expert perspectives on popular health topics.

  • Community


    Connect with people like you, and get expert guidance on living a healthy life.

Got a health question? Get answers provided by leading organizations, doctors, and experts.

Get Answers

Sign up to receive WebMD's award-winning content delivered to your inbox.

Sign Up

5) Invest in a meat thermometer.

The time frame necessary to cook foods thoroughly on a grill may be different from your stove at home. "A meat thermometer is the best way to be sure you have cooked foods adequately," says DuBois.

Unfortunately, people aren't always going to take the time to check hamburgers on the barbecue with a thermometer, says Slade, who is also an associate professor at the Illinois Institute of Technology. Hamburger meat can be very risky if not handled properly. Unlike a steak, hamburger meat is chopped and reduced, and the bacteria may get internalized, says Slade. "Once you sear a steak on the outside, it tends to be safe. This isn't the case with hamburger, which needs to be cooked until the meat in the middle is brown."

Hamburgers aren't the only foods that should be thoroughly cooked -- eggs shouldn't be runny, hot dogs should be piping hot, and chicken shouldn't be pink in the middle. Also, don't partially pre-cook meats or poultry to "finish off" later, which may facilitate bacterial growth, and remember to defrost meat or poultry in the refrigerator, not on the counter.

6) Tell your kids about food safety.

When you teach your kids about safety, don't forget to tell them the rules about how to handle foods. "It's very important that children learn from a very early age about the importance of hand washing and that they are aware that foods can make them ill if they aren't properly handled," says DuBois.

7) Enjoy non-perishable snacks.

Don't let a lack of snacks spoil your fun. If you're planning to be outside for a while, bring some non-perishable foods. Nuts, chips, peanut butter, breads, and granola bars are all examples of foods that won't spoil and are easy to transport.

8) Play it safe with leftovers.

If you plan on enjoying leftovers for days to come, don't keep food sitting out for two hours repeatedly, which Slade says may cause problems. Instead, remove the portion you want and return leftover containers to the fridge promptly, and freeze portions you don't plan on eating in the near future.

Healthy Recipe Finder

Browse our collection of healthy, delicious recipes, from WebMD and Eating Well magazine.

Top searches: Chicken, Chocolate, Salad, Desserts, Soup

Healthy Recipe Finder