Find Information About:

Drugs & Supplements

Get information and reviews on prescription drugs, over-the-counter medications, vitamins, and supplements. Search by name or medical condition.

Pill Identifier

Pill Identifier

Having trouble identifying your pills?

Enter the shape, color, or imprint of your prescription or OTC drug. Our pill identification tool will display pictures that you can compare to your pill.

Get Started

My Medicine

Save your medicine, check interactions, sign up for FDA alerts, create family profiles and more.

Get Started

WebMD Health Experts and Community

Talk to health experts and other people like you in WebMD's Communities. It's a safe forum where you can create or participate in support groups and discussions about health topics that interest you.

  • Second Opinion

    Second Opinion

    Read expert perspectives on popular health topics.

  • Community


    Connect with people like you, and get expert guidance on living a healthy life.

Got a health question? Get answers provided by leading organizations, doctors, and experts.

Get Answers

Sign up to receive WebMD's award-winning content delivered to your inbox.

Sign Up

Can the seeds heal?

Sept. 11, 2000 -- At 42, Linda Walsh of Buena Park, Calif., could hardly believe that age spots were spreading up her shins and down her feet. To make matters worse, her hair was beginning to fall out, her joints were becoming stiffer by the day, and fatigue weighed every step she took.

Then she discovered grape-seed extract.

Now, four years later, Walsh's skin is free of blemishes, her hair is lustrous and full, and there's a new bounce in her stride. "I feel good and I look five years younger than before," she says. For this transformation, Walsh gives credit to an extract taken from the seeds of ordinary grapes. She's so enthusiastic that she now sells the extract and other supplements full time.

Indeed, glowing testimonials from people like Walsh have made grape-seed extract one of the most popular supplements in the United States. In 1999, Americans spent $141 million on grape-seed products, a jump of 26% over the previous year, according to The Hartman Group, a market research firm.

So do grape seeds really work? The question is far from settled, but scientists aren't ready to rule out the possibility that they might. The key ingredient in grape seeds has shown promise against disease-causing chemicals in test tubes. And a few preliminary experiments in humans have produced intriguing results.


One reason it's not easy to weigh the claims for grape-seed extract is that much of the research is done by people with a stake in selling it. Many of the studies most often cited come from the laboratory of Debasis Bagchi, PhD, a Creighton University professor of pharmaceutical and administrative sciences who also works for grape-seed product maker InterHealth Nutraceuticals.

Bagchi has labored to show that a substance within grape-seed extract, oligoproanthocyanidin, or OPC, is a powerful antioxidant. Antioxidants disarm free radicals -- molecules that can damage DNA, cells, and tissues, eventually contributing to heart disease, cancer, and other illnesses. Because of its structure, one OPC molecule can neutralize several free radicals at once, while each molecule of better-known antioxidants like vitamins C and E can handle only one at a time, Bagchi says.

Healthy Recipe Finder

Browse our collection of healthy, delicious recipes, from WebMD and Eating Well magazine.

Top searches: Chicken, Chocolate, Salad, Desserts, Soup

Healthy Recipe Finder