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  • Question 1/14

    Which of the following is a benefit of moderate and heavy drinking?

  • Answer 1/14

    Which of the following is a benefit of moderate and heavy drinking?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    There are no benefits to heavy drinking. It causes you to put on weight, lessens your mental focus, and makes you more likely to get cancer. It also boosts your odds of injury by accident or violence. One way or another, it plays a part in some 88,000 deaths a year in the U.S.

  • Question 1/14

    How many drinks per week make a woman a "heavy drinker?"

  • Answer 1/14

    How many drinks per week make a woman a "heavy drinker?"

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Toss back more than 3 drinks on any single day or more than 7 a week and you could be labeled a heavy drinker.  The numbers for men are higher:  4 drinks a day or more than 14 per week. What’s a drink? Just 0.6 ounces of alcohol -- roughly the amount in 12 ounces of beer, 5 ounces of wine, or 1.5 ounces of 80-proof liquor.

  • Question 1/14

    Name a risk of heavy drinking.

  • Answer 1/14

    Name a risk of heavy drinking.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    There’s a long list of bad things too much alcohol can do to your health. You could be more likely to get diabetes, cirrhosis of the liver, and high blood pressure, or have a stroke. Quite a few types of cancer are tied to overdoing it as well. These include mouth, larynx, and esophageal cancers, breast cancer, plus cancers of the liver, gastrointestinal tract, and colon.

  • Question 1/14

    Heavy drinking can shrink your brain.

  • Answer 1/14

    Heavy drinking can shrink your brain.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Long-term heavy drinking can shrink both the overall brain and the size of the brain's cells. The result: problems with learning, memory and problem solving.The longer and harder you drink, the more likely you’ll have trouble with sleep, mood, and motor skills. If you avoid alcohol, you might reverse some of the damage.

  • Question 1/14

    A few drinks could be good for your heart.

  • Answer 1/14

    A few drinks could be good for your heart.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    There’s some evidence that a bit of alcohol could make you less likely to get heart disease. It’s possible that alcohol raises levels of "good" cholesterol. However, the key word here is "moderation." Long-term heavy drinking weakens the heart muscle and can contribute to high blood pressure, stroke, and, heart failure.

  • Question 1/14

    Middle-aged and older occasional to moderate drinkers will outlive their teetotaler friends.

  • Answer 1/14

    Middle-aged and older occasional to moderate drinkers will outlive their teetotaler friends.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Doctors aren’t sure why, but once you hit middle age, there’s a link between an occasional drink and staying alive. It could be the protective effects of moderate drinking against heart disease, stroke, and diabetes.

  • Question 1/14

    If you don’t drink, start. It’s good for your heart.

  • Answer 1/14

    If you don’t drink, start. It’s good for your heart.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    If you don't drink, keep it that way. Health benefits aside, even a small amount of alcohol can make you more likely to get a disease or have an accident.

  • Question 1/14

    A glass or two of red wine can make you less likely to get:

  • Answer 1/14

    A glass or two of red wine can make you less likely to get:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Everyone thought that resveratrol, an ingredient in red wine, improved health. But new research shows it does not prevent heart disease or cancer, and it doesn't help you live longer.

  • Answer 1/14

    Which has the most calories?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    That glass of frosty, tropical, pina colada goodness weighs in at 460 calories. A regular beer is about 150 calories per bottle and a light beer 110. Wine is around 90-105 calories a glass.

  • Question 1/14

    Alcohol can keep your mind sharp as you age.

  • Answer 1/14

    Alcohol can keep your mind sharp as you age.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Although researchers caution that more study is needed, evidence suggests that light to moderate drinking in early adult life may help protect against dementia in later life.  But the research results have been mixed. Two studies found that only wine had the protective effect while other types of alcohol may in fact increase risk of dementia. 

    As with other potential benefits, these positive effects are associated only with light or moderate -- but not heavy -- drinking.

  • Question 1/14

    How much of all the alcohol Americans drink each year goes during binge drinking sessions?

  • Answer 1/14

    How much of all the alcohol Americans drink each year goes during binge drinking sessions?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Binge drinkers -- that’s women who have 4 or more drinks on one occasion or men who have 5 --  guzzle down more than half of all the alcohol we drink in the U.S. Binges accounts for 90% of all alcohol use for the under-21 crowd.

    Binges are linked to many health problems, from high blood pressure and heart attacks to sexually transmitted diseases and unintended pregnancy. Injury, violence, and suicide also go hand-in-hand with bingeing.

  • Question 1/14

    Most binge drinkers are alcoholics.

  • Answer 1/14

    Most binge drinkers are alcoholics.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Most binge drinkers are casual drinkers who sometimes overdo it.  This is a type of alcohol abuse, but alcoholism is a disease marked by a strong craving for alcohol, an inability to limit drinking, and continued drinking despite physical, psychological, or interpersonal problems.

  • Question 1/14

    Caffeine and alcohol make a dangerous pair.

  • Answer 1/14

    Caffeine and alcohol make a dangerous pair.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Caffeine masks clues about your level of intoxication. Drinkers who mix alcohol and caffeine also are twice as likely to be taken advantage of sexually or to ride with an impaired driver.

  • Question 1/14

    Alcohol hits women harder than men.

  • Answer 1/14

    Alcohol hits women harder than men.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Most women weigh less, so a drink delivers more of a punch. Women also have less water content in their bodies than men, so the alcohol doesn’t get as diluted.

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Sources | Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on July 27, 2016 Medically Reviewed on July 27, 2016

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on
July 27, 2016

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

Henrik Sorensen / Digital Vision

 

REFERENCES:

American Heart Association: "Alcohol and Cardiovascular Disease."

CDC: "Alcohol and Public Health: Frequently Asked Questions," "Fact Sheets: Binge Drinking,"  “Caffeinated Alcoholic Beverages: Fact Sheet,” "Binge Drinking -- United States, 2009."

FDA: "FDA to Examine the Safety of Caffeinated Alcoholic Beverages," "Serious Concerns Over Alcoholic Beverages with Added Caffeine."

Harvard School of Public Health: "Alcohol: Balancing Risks and Benefits."

National Cancer Institute: "Red Wine and Cancer Prevention: Fact Sheet."

National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism: "Beyond Hangovers," "Alcohol Calorie Calculator,"  "Alcohol's Damaging Effects on the Brain," "Are Women More Vulnerable to Alcohol's Effects?"

The National Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: "Women, Pregnancy, and Alcohol: Risk Factors."

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, McKinley Health Center: "Alcohol and Nutrition: 101."

This tool does not provide medical advice.
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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.