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  • Question 1/16

    Which kind of chocolate is healthiest?

  • Answer 1/16

    Which kind of chocolate is healthiest?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    It's not up there with spinach, but dark chocolate is usually your healthiest bet. The darker chocolate is, often the less fat and sugar it has.

     

    Plus, dark chocolate usually is least processed -- that means it has the most antioxidant-like flavonoids, which may help lower blood pressure and cholesterol. The higher the percentage of cocoa, typically the more flavonoids the chocolate has.

     

    But don't eat lots of chocolate in hopes of better health. A serving size is about the same as a package of dental floss.

  • Question 1/16

    Chocolate was believed to be so powerful that at one time:

  • Answer 1/16

    Chocolate was believed to be so powerful that at one time:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Chocolate has a long reputation as an aphrodisiac. Aztec ruler Montezuma supposedly drank a chocolaty concoction before visiting the women in his harem.

     

    It’s also believed that nuns were forbidden to eat it at one time because it was thought to be so romantically potent. And French doctors supposedly used it to treat broken hearts.

  • Question 1/16

    How many milk chocolate bars would you have to eat to get the caffeine in one cup of coffee?

  • Answer 1/16

    How many milk chocolate bars would you have to eat to get the caffeine in one cup of coffee?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Chocolate does have caffeine. But if you're looking to get a caffeine boost, chocolate isn't your best bet.

     

    You’d need to eat 14 regular-sized (1.5-ounce) bars of milk chocolate to get the same caffeine as you’d find in an 8-ounce cup of coffee! That would have about 3,000 calories and more than 300 grams of sugar -- compared to only about two calories in black coffee.

     

    Dark chocolate does have more caffeine than milk chocolate. Even then, it would take four bars to give you the same buzz as one cup of regular Joe.

  • Answer 1/16

    Why is white chocolate white?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    White chocolate has cocoa butter, so technically it’s called chocolate. But it doesn't have cocoa solids -- the ingredient that gives chocolate its dark, rich color.

  • Question 1/16

    The average American eats about this much chocolate each year:

  • Answer 1/16

    The average American eats about this much chocolate each year:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Chocoholics 'r' us! We each eat close to a dozen pounds of chocolate per year. And most of that is milk chocolate. More than 90% of Americans say they prefer milk chocolate over dark or white.

     

    It takes a long time to work off all that chocolate. It would take a 130-pound woman about 4 days and nights (95 hours) of brisk walking to burn off those calories!

     

  • Question 1/16

    When do people buy the most candy?

  • Answer 1/16

    When do people buy the most candy?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Believe it or not, Valentine's Day isn't No. 1 when it comes to buying sweets. Halloween, Easter, and Christmas are all bigger candy-buying occasions.

     

    But that doesn't mean chocolate isn't big on February 14. More than 36 million heart-shaped boxes of candy are sold each Valentine's Day.

  • Question 1/16

    Why is chocolate associated with love?

  • Answer 1/16

    Why is chocolate associated with love?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Chocolate has hundreds of chemicals, and some work on the brain. According to some research, eating chocolate stimulates your brain to make opioids -- kind of giving you a natural high that makes you feel happy like when you are in love.

  • Question 1/16

    What can you add to your brownie mix to pump up the chocolate flavor?

  • Answer 1/16

    What can you add to your brownie mix to pump up the chocolate flavor?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Want to give your brownies or other chocolate baked goods a little extra chocolaty goodness? Try adding a bit of instant espresso powder -- a teaspoon or less -- in your next recipe. Espresso powder can ramp up the chocolate taste in cakes, brownies, and cookies without adding coffee flavor or many calories. You can also replace the water the recipe calls for with strong coffee. 

  • Question 1/16

    Which part of a chocolate Easter Bunny do most people eat first?

  • Answer 1/16

    Which part of a chocolate Easter Bunny do most people eat first?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Poor Easter Bunny. At least he can't hear us when we're eating him. An overwhelming number of us (76%) chomp off the ears of a chocolate bunny first before devouring the rest of him.

     

    Nearly 90 million chocolate bunnies are made each year to feed our need to nibble.

  • Question 1/16

    Centuries ago, doctors used chocolate to treat:

  • Answer 1/16

    Centuries ago, doctors used chocolate to treat:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    The Mayans and Aztecs believed chocolate had all kinds of healing powers. They used it to treat everything from fevers and seizures to skin infections.

     

    When chocolate made its way to Europe in the 1600s, some doctors used it to try to treat illnesses -- like ulcers and ringworm. Meanwhile, other docs thought it caused illnesses and drunkenness!

  • Question 1/16

    Chocolate can cause:

  • Answer 1/16

    Chocolate can cause:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Don't blame chocolate for your acne. Although diet -- especially greasy foods and chocolate -- are often blamed for breakouts, there's little proof that there's any connection.



    However, people with migraines aren't so lucky. Their headaches may be triggered by certain foods. And chocolate is reported as a common trigger.

  • Question 1/16

    What did the Aztecs do with cacao beans?

  • Answer 1/16

    What did the Aztecs do with cacao beans?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    You think you love chocolate? The Aztecs valued it so much they made it into drinks and used it for important religious and royal events.

     

    But they couldn't grow cacao (the beans used to make chocolate) in their very dry climate. Instead, they traded with other cultures for the beans or made the people they conquered pay taxes with them.

  • Question 1/16

    Chocolate is the secret ingredient in which food:

  • Answer 1/16

    Chocolate is the secret ingredient in which food:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Who knows? You could experiment -- chocolate mightmake almost any food more interesting. But in Mexico, cacao seeds are put in a traditional dish called molé. It’s often served as part of Day of the Dead ceremonies, where families celebrate and honor family members who have died.

  • Question 1/16

    Chocolate is better for your teeth than dried fruit.

  • Answer 1/16

    Chocolate is better for your teeth than dried fruit.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    All sweets are not created equal when it comes to your teeth. A piece of chocolate actually does less damage to your teeth than dried fruit because you eat it and it dissolves. Dried fruit -- and hard candy -- leave sugars that stick to your teeth.



     

    It's always a good idea to brush after eating sweets to get rid of that sugar. If you can't brush, at least rinse your mouth with water and swish some sugar away.

  • Question 1/16

    Plain low-fat milk and low-fat chocolate milk are about the same nutritionally.

  • Answer 1/16

    Plain low-fat milk and low-fat chocolate milk are about the same nutritionally.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Plain low-fat milk and low-fat chocolate milk have the same amount of protein -- about 8 grams in an 8-ounce glass. But chocolate milk has about 50 calories more per cup and 8-12 grams of sugar (some of it from lactose, or naturally occurring milk sugar). 

  • Answer 1/16

    What is Dutch-process chocolate?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Dutch-processed or Dutched chocolate is cocoa powder or chocolate liquor that has been treated to end up with a milder taste and a darker color.

     

    Dutched or alkalized cocoa is used in delicate, European-type baking. Natural, unsweetened cocoa powder is more intense and often used in brownies, cookies, and cakes.

  • Your Score:

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    Your Score:

    You correctly answered out of questions.

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    Sweet! You know your chocolate. You have major chocolate street cred. Ready to show us how much you know about ice cream?

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    Hmmm, bittersweet. Looks like you learned a little bit about chocolate. You’re not a chocolate know-it-all. But then again, who likes a know-it-all? Try again to score higher. Or see how you fare on our Dessert Damage Controlquiz.

    Results:

    Meh. Looks like you learned a chunk about chocolate. That’s OK, we won’t tell. Silver lining: You might need to spend some time up close and personal with chocolate to brush up on your knowledge.

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Sources | Reviewed by William Blahd, MD on June 15, 2016 Medically Reviewed on June 15, 2016

Reviewed by William Blahd, MD on
June 15, 2016

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

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SOURCES:

24/7 Wall St: "America's Favorite Chocolate Brands."

American Heart Association: "Sugar and Carbohydrates."

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center: "The Truth About Chocolate and Your Heart."

Bon Appetit: "Instant Espresso Powder."

Candy Industry: "US chocolate sales up, volume down."

Center for Science in the Public Interest: "Caffeine Content in Food & Drugs."

ChooseMyPlate.gov: "Supertracker."

Clemson University Cooperative Extension: "When it Comes to Chocolate, Choose Dark."

Cleveland Clinic: "Heart-Health Benefits of Chocolate Revealed."

County of San Diego: "Candy is Dandy … but Tough on Teeth."

Drewnowski, A. Trends in Food Science & Technology, 1992.

Godiva: "Chocolate trivia."

Gourmet: "The History of Valentine's Day … and Chocolate."

Hersheys: "Nutrition Information."

Joy of Baking: "Cocoa Powder."

MedlinePlus: "Acne."

National Confectioners Association: "Chocolate Terms and Definitions," "Fun Facts About Easter," "Fun Facts About Valentine's Day."

Neuroscience for Kids, University of Washington: "Discovering the Sweet Mysteries of Chocolate."

Mars.

Snickers.

The Field Museum: "Chocolate as a Cure," "Chocolate's Roots in Ancient Mesoamerica," "History of Chocolate: Obtaining Cacao," "Is Chocolate Addictive?" "The Lure and Lore of Chocolate."

University of Michigan Integrative Medicine: "Dark Chocolate."

University of Minnesota: "Migraines."

University of Southern California: "Ask the Expert: Does sugar really rot your teeth?"

U.S. Department of Agriculture: "What's in a Serving Size?"

USDA National Nutrient Database.

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.