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How to choose the best fruit of the spring season.

Spring Fruit GuideDelicious spring fruit—strawberries, apricots, mangoes and rhubarb—is in the market now. This handy guide offers information on picking the best spring fruit and the health benefits of each.


Before peaches, plums and berries appear in markets, apricots arrive. Ancient Romans were so impressed by this fruit’s early ripening that they took to calling it praecocium, Latin for "precocious." Most apricots are destined to be canned or dried, and their season is fleeting, so get fresh ones fast.

What You Get: Low in calories and packed with nutrients, just three fresh apricots will give you almost half the vitamin A you need for the day along with a healthy dose of vitamin C, potassium and fiber. In addition, apricots are packed with beta carotene, an antioxidant that helps neutralize free radicals that damage cells.

Shopping Tips: Purchase plump, fairly firm apricots that are orange-yellow to orange. Ripe apricots are soft and juicy—they should be eaten as soon as possible.

Storage Tips: To ripen apricots, place hard fruit in a brown paper bag for one or two days. Ripe apricots should be stored in the refrigerator to prevent overripening.

Fresh apricots can be frozen: Just halve the fruit, remove the pit and freeze on a baking sheet. Once frozen, place the apricots in a sealable plastic bag.


Mangoes have been integrated into food cultures across the globe—sold fresh, as juice, in drinks, in curries and in desserts—for every meal.

What You Get: The deep orange color of mangoes comes from a high content of beta carotene, a potent anticancer agent. Mangoes also contain vitamin C, fiber, lutein, potassium and zeaxanthin, phytochemicals known to boost the immune system.

Shopping Tips: Most mangoes in U.S. grocery stores are one of five varieties: Ataulfo, Francine, Keitt, Kent, Tommy Atkins.

Color is not an indication of ripeness, as mangoes come in many shades of green, yellow and red.

Choose mangoes with a slight "give" if you plan to eat them in a day or two and choose firmer mangoes for enjoying later.

Storage Tips: Unripe mangoes will ripen at room temperature.

Refrigerate ripe mangoes for up to 5 days.

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