Reviewed by Arefa Cassoobhoy on July 20, 2015

Sources

UpToDate: "Benefits and risks of caffeine and caffeinated beverages," "Caffeine content in foods and beverages."

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Video Transcript

SPEAKER: Sure, the smell of bacon in the morning is great and all.

But nothing beats coffee.

But is it good for you?

Well, let's get to the truth about coffee.

Can you get addicted to coffee?

No.

Now, if you've been hopped up on caffeine for years, and one day you suddenly switch to decaf, your head's going to hurt.

But the withdrawal is only temporary.

And most experts don't think caffeine addiction is a big problem.

It's not like you're going to need rehab.

Does decaf mean it has no caffeine?

Not quite.

A regular cup of coffee has around 130 milligrams of caffeine.

A cup of decaf has about five milligrams.

That's about the same amount as a cup of hot cocoa or half of a bar of chocolate.

Should I ever cut back on coffee?

Sometimes.

If you have osteoporosis, keep your intake to three cups a day.

And cut out the caffeine if you have insomnia.

Also, while caffeine can get rid of headaches, bigger coffee drinkers have a bigger chance of getting migraines.

So if you drink another cup, that relief might only be temporary.

And finally, here is the big one.

Is drinking coffee every day OK?

Yes.

It turns out if you drink up to three eight-ounce cups of coffee every day, you actually get a lot of health benefits.

And we're not talking little things.

No.

Coffee drinkers seem more protected against big things like diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, liver disease, and gout.

The truth is, coffee is good.

So go ahead and fill her up.