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Health Care Reform:

Health Insurance & Affordable Care Act

WebMD News from Kaiser Health News

Lessons From The Obamacare Data Dump

By Jay Hancock

Thu, Sep 26 2013

This week the Department of Health and Human Services released a ton of information about how insurance sold in 36 states under the Affordable Care Act will work. Most of it came in the form of data showing the number of carriers and their premium prices in hundreds of regions.

Until now we've seen information on subsidized policies to be sold through online marketplaces released in trickles by states that are creating their own online portals.

The federal data covers states that dumped all or part of the work of building the marketplaces on the feds. It’s the biggest chunk of information so far available, even though many critical pieces — the identity of the insurers, the structure of the benefits, the networks of the hospitals and doctors — won't be known until next week. That's when the online portals in every state are scheduled to start selling subsidized insurance made available by the ACA to those who aren't otherwise covered.

The Obama administration boasted that the average premiums came out lower than projected by the Congressional Budget Office. Opponents of the ACA countered that many people buying through the exchanges, especially younger, healthier consumers, may pay substantially more than what they pay now.

But those were only the headlines. Here’s what else the data show:

— Competition equals lower prices. In regions with only one insurance company selling through the subsidized exchange, the average monthly premium for a 21-year-old buying the lowest cost bronze policy is $186, before any subsidies are applied. In regions with 10 or more rival carriers, the average cost is $132 or less.

In the exchanges' metal rating system, bronze plans are the least expensive category, covering 60 percent of medical costs on average after you pay the premium.

— The number of insurance companies selling through the subsidized marketplace varies hugely from one area to another. In many parts of West Virginia, Arkansas and Alabama, only one company is selling policies to individuals and families through the subsidized exchange. (Insurers may also offer policies outside the exchange.)

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