Skip to content

Health Care Reform:

Health Insurance & Affordable Care Act

Health Law Requires Medicare To Cover Dementia Evaluation

WebMD News from Kaiser Health News

By Michelle Andrews

Mon, May 05 2014

For the millions of seniors who worry that losing their keys may mean they’re losing their minds, the health law now requires Medicare to cover a screening for cognitive impairment during an annual wellness visit.

But in a recent review of the scientific research, an influential group said there wasn’t enough evidence to recommend dementia screening for asymptomatic people over age 65.

What’s a worried senior to think?

Dementia screening tests are typically short questionnaires that assess such things as memory, attention and language and/or visuospatial skills. One of the most common, the mini-mental state examination, consists of 30 questions (such as “What month is this?” and “What country are we in?”) and may be completed in about 10 minutes.

In its review, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, an independent panel of medical experts, evaluated the evidence of the benefits, harms and clinical utility of various screening instruments for cognitive impairment. It concluded that the evidence for routine population-based screening was insufficient. While declining to recommend the practice for everyone older than 65, the reviewers noted that some screening tools can be useful in identifying dementia.

“Clinicians need to use their judgment,” says Albert Siu, professor and chair of geriatrics and palliative care at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York who was co-vice chair of the task force on dementia screening. “The evidence isn’t clear that there is a net benefit to screening for individuals that are asymptomatic.”

The risk of dementia increases with age: its prevalence is 5 percent in people aged 71 to 79, rising to 37 percent of those older than 90. Mild cognitive impairment has many definitions, but the term generally refers to people whose impairment isn’t severe enough to hamper their ability to manage their daily lives. By some estimates up to 42 percent of people older than 65 have it. Mild cognitive impairment is a warning sign, but it may not progress to Alzheimer’s disease, says Dean Hartley, director of science initiatives at the Alzheimer’s Association.  

Loading …
URAC: Accredited Health Web Site TRUSTe online privacy certification HONcode Seal AdChoices