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4. Vitamin D continued...

Who Needs It and How Much:

Babies and children should get at least 400 IU of vitamin D daily, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics. Breastfed babies need vitamin D supplement drops until they are weaned and are getting at least 32 ounces of  vitamin D fortified infant formula or milk.

Foods That Have It:

Some fish, including salmon, mackerel, and sardines, are excellent sources of vitamin D, as are eggs (D is found in the yolk) and fortified milk. Vegetarian and vegan families should look for fortified cereals high in D. Still, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends vitamin D supplements for all kids, unless they're getting 400 IU from their diet.

5. Vitamin E

Vitamin E strengthens the body's immune system. It also helps keep blood vessels clear and flowing well.

Who Needs It and How Much:

  • Ages 1-3 need 9 IU of vitamin E daily.
  • Ages 4-8 need 10.4 IU daily.
  • Ages 9-13 need 16.4 IU daily.
  • Teens need as much as adults: 22 IU daily.

Foods That Have It:

Vegetable oils such as sunflower and safflower oils, as well as nuts and seeds including almonds, hazelnuts and sunflower seeds, are excellent vitamin E sources.

6. Iron

Iron helps red blood cells carry oxygen throughout the body.

Who Needs It and How Much:

Kids' iron requirements range between 7-10 milligrams (mg) a day. By their teen years, boys need about 11 mg a day and girls who have started menstruating need more, about 15 mg.

Foods That Have It:

Red meats and other animal products are high in iron. Non-meat sources of iron include dark green leafy veggies (spinach, collard greens, kale) and beans such as kidney, navy, lima, and soy.