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Screening Tests for Women Only

Screening Test Ages 40-49 Ages 50-64
Bone mineral density test (screening for osteoporosis) Testing not recommended. The USPSTF recommends starting routine screening at age 65, or at age 60 for women at increased risk for osteoporosis. Check with your doctor about your risk of osteoporosis.
Breast cancer screening (mammogram)

The USPSTF says check with your doctor about whether you need testing.

American Cancer Society says get a mammogram every year starting at age 40.

The USPSTF says get tested every 2 years, starting at age 50.

American Cancer Society says get a mammogram every year.

Cervical cancer screening (Pap test) Get  a Pap test every 3 years, or a Pap test along with a human papillomavirus (HPV) test every 5 years. No testing is needed if you had a hysterectomy and have no history of a high-grade precancerous lesion. Get a Pap test every 3 years or a Pap test along with a human papillomavirus (HPV) test every 5 years. No testing is needed if you had a hysterectomy and have no history of a high-grade precancerous lesion.
Chlamydia test Whether or not you are pregnant, get tested if you are sexually active and at increased risk. Get tested if you are sexually active and at increased risk.
Gonorrhea test Whether or not you are pregnant, get tested for gonorrhea if you are sexually active and at increased risk. Get tested for gonorrhea if you are sexually active and at increased risk.

 

 

Screening Tests for Men Only

For men, there is a screening test for prostate cancer called the PSA test. There are conflicting guidelines on this test.

The USPSTF says men should not get routine PSA testing. The American Cancer Society says starting at age 50, possibly earlier if at high risk, men should discuss the pros and cons of the PSA test with their doctor to decide if it's right for them.

The American Urological Association says if you are a man aged 55 to 69 you should talk to your doctor about the benefits and risks of a PSA test. You should also talk to your doctor about the pros and cons of getting a test if you are at higher risk of prostate cancer.

But the American Urological Association says the PSA test is not recommended if you are a man who is:

  • Under age 40
  • At average risk between the ages of 40 to 54
  • Age 70 or older