Skip to content

    Health Care Reform:

    Health Insurance & Affordable Care Act

    Top 10 Ways to Make Your Health Benefits Work for You

    1. Your Options Are Important

    There are many different types of health benefit plans. Find out which one your employer offers, then check out the plan, or plans, offered. Your employer's human resource office, the health plan administrator, or your union can provide information to help you match your needs and preferences with the available plans. The more information you have, the better your health care decisions will be.

    2. Review the Benefits Available

    Do the plans offered cover preventive care, well-baby care, vision or dental care? Are there deductibles? Answers to these questions can help determine the out-of-pocket expenses you may face. Matching your needs and those of your family members will result in the best possible benefits. Cheapest may not always be best. Your goal is high quality health benefits.

    3. Look for Quality

    The quality of health care services varies, but quality can be measured. You should consider the quality of health care in deciding among the health care plans or options available to you. Not all health plans, doctors, hospitals and other providers give the highest quality care. Fortunately, there is quality information you can use right now to help you compare your health care choices. Find out how you can measure quality. Consult Choosing and Using a Health Plan from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

    4. Your Plan's Summary Plan Description (SPD) Provides a Wealth of Information

    Your health plan administrator should provide a copy. It outlines your benefits and your legal rights under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA), the federal law that protects your health benefits. It should contain information about the coverage of dependents, what services will require a co-pay, and the circumstances under which your employer can change or terminate a health benefits plan. Save the SPD and all other health plan brochures and documents, along with memos or correspondence from your employer relating to health benefits.

    5. Assess Your Benefit Coverage as Your Family Status Changes

    Marriage, divorce, child birth or adoption, or the death of a spouse are life events that may signal a need to change your health benefits. You, your spouse and dependent children may be eligible for a special enrollment period under provisions of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA). Even without life-changing events, the information provided by your employer should tell you how you can change benefits or switch plans, if more than one plan is offered. A special note: If your spouse's employer also offers a health benefits package, consider coordinating both plans for maximum coverage.

    Today on WebMD

    stethoscope on person's chest
    Your Marketplace choices,
    doctor
    How not to waste money on health care.
     
    man in cafe looking at computer
    Finding low-cost health insurance.
    doctor showing girl a stethoscope
    Get the facts on health insurance.
     
    Loading …
    URAC: Accredited Health Web Site TRUSTe online privacy certification HONcode Seal AdChoices