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This content is selected and controlled by WebMD's editorial staff and is brought to you by Actavis.

If you want some regular help with taking care of your loved one -- or just need some occasional relief -- there are lots of options. You just need to know how -- and where -- to ask for it.

Look for Backup

Family and friends. Start with the obvious. Don't hesitate to ask other family members to help out with caregiving and ease your load a bit. Figure out what you need, and be direct. See if your brother can start handling your mom's doctor's visits. Or ask your teenage daughter to take her out for a movie so you can get some time off. You might find they're more willing to help than you thought.

Senior centers. They typically offer meals and programs for recreation and exercise. Some of them may provide transportation for your loved one. They're also a great place for you to network with other caregivers.

Adult day care. You can find programs here that are similar to those at senior centers, but it may also have more extensive services if your loved one needs more care. Costs vary quite a bit from region to region.

Help at home. Personal and in-home care services can help with daily activities, such as getting your loved one dressed or preparing his meals.

If your loved one could just use some companionship during the day, a volunteer organization might help.

If he needs medical care, consider home health care. Depending on what you need, the costs for these caregiving services vary from free to hundreds of dollars a day.

Keep in mind that Medicare might cover some costs if your loved one is recovering from an injury or surgery. Medicaid may pay some of the costs, too, if your income is low.

Meal programs. Many areas have local groups -- such as Meals On Wheels -- that provide free or low-cost nutritious meals. Some grocery stores offer prepared meals that can be delivered.

Where to Get Advice

Talk about your loved one's needs with a geriatric care manager. You may need to pay for his services, but he can help you find caregiving resources in your area, guide you on financial and legal issues, and coordinate different types of care. Together, you can come up with a caregiving plan.

There are also many government and nonprofit organizations that can tell you where to get more caregiving help. They include:

Eldercare Locator. It helps find local organizations that provide care to older people. 

BenefitsCheckUp. It can find programs that help you pay for medicine and other health care needs.

Area Agency on Aging. It can point you to local sources of caregiving help and information.

Even though you may not realize it, you may already know some great caregiving resources. Start talking to your doctors, nurses, relatives, friends, and neighbors. They could know details about local services and facilities that you can't learn anywhere else.

There is no evidence that NAMENDA XR® prevents or slows the underlying disease process in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

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Who should NOT take NAMENDA XR?

NAMENDA XR should not be taken by anyone who is allergic (hypersensitive) to memantine, the active substance in NAMENDA XR, or who has had a bad reaction to NAMENDA XR or any of its ingredients.

What should be discussed with the healthcare provider before taking NAMENDA XR?

Before starting NAMENDA XR, talk to the healthcare provider about all of the patient's past and present medical conditions, including:

  • Seizure disorders
  • Difficulty passing urine
  • Liver, kidney, or bladder problems

If the patient is taking other medications (including those without a prescription), ask the healthcare provider if NAMENDA XR is right for the patient.

  • Certain medications, changes in diet, or medical conditions may affect the amount of NAMENDA XR in the body and possibly increase side effects.

What are the possible side effects of NAMENDA XR?

The most common side effects associated with NAMENDA XR treatment are headache, diarrhea, and dizziness. This is not a complete list of side effects.

NAMENDA XR® (memantine hydrochloride) extended-release capsules are approved for the treatment of moderate to severe Alzheimer's disease. NAMENDA XR is available by prescription only.

Please see full Prescribing Information, including Patient Information.