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Aging Gracefully and Naturally

A look at how - and if - we can delay aging, naturally.
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WebMD Feature

Throughout the ages, people have been searching for the elusive "Fountain of Youth." And this desire for a magical place, pill, or tonic that can prevent or reverse the effects of aging has sired a new, and growing, field of medicine -- antiaging medicine.

These days, there is a plethora of alternative treatments touted as antiaging remedies from "magical" fruits, wrinkle-erasers, memory enhancers, and other supplements to transcendental meditation, special diets, and physiologic purification to remove toxins from the body.

Recommended Related to Healthy Seniors

The Art of Aging Gracefully

In Nora Ephron's best-selling book, I Feel Bad About My Neck, she laments the sorry state of her 60-something neck: "Our faces are lies and our necks are the truth. You have to cut open a redwood tree to see how old it is, but you wouldn't have to if it had a neck," she writes. "Every so often I read a book about age, and whoever's writing it says it's great to be old. It's great to be wise and sage and mellow; it's great to be at the point where you understand just what matters in life. I...

Read the The Art of Aging Gracefully article > >

But can you really turn back the hands -- or crow's feet -- of time? Here's what the experts have to say.

Bye-Bye Botox, Hello Blueberries?

According to the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, more than 1.6 million botulinum toxin (commonly referred to as Botox) procedures were performed in 2002, making it the most popular nonsurgical procedure. By temporarily paralyzing the muscles that cause wrinkles, Botox has been shown to dramatically reduce the appearance of moderate to severe frown lines, or furrows, between the eyebrows. In fact, women with frown lines and crows' feet are gathering in living rooms across the nation to get the shots that smooth facial wrinkles as Botox parties become the Tupperware parties of new millennium.

However, some research suggests that having people over for blueberry pie may be as effective.

"Blueberries, strawberries, cranberries, and raspberries are all loaded with antioxidants, which save cells from premature aging," says dermatologist Nicholas V. Perricone, MD, a clinical professor of medicine at Michigan State University in East Lansing, Mich., and the author of The Perricone Prescription and The Wrinkle Cure: Unlock the Power of Cosmeceuticals for Supple, Youthful Skin.

What's more, a diet rich in blueberry extract improved short-term memory loss and reversed some loss of balance and coordination in aging rats, according to a study in the Journal of Neuroscience. Though rats that consumed an extract of blueberries, strawberries, and spinach every day showed improvements in short-term memory, only the blueberry extract improved balance and coordination.

A previous study done earlier this year by the same Tufts University researchers showed that when compared with other fruits or vegetables, blueberries have the highest amount of antioxidants, which are believed to help prevent cancer and other diseases.

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