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    Older Doctors Learn New Tricks

    Good Samaritans
    By
    WebMD Feature
    Reviewed by Craig H. Kliger, MD

    Feb. 12, 2001 (San Mateo, Calif.) -- Floriberto sits on the edge of an exam table, wearing a zippered gray sweatshirt, jeans, sandals, an immaculately crisp Raiders cap, and a look of unrelenting pain. His right cheek bulges noticeably.

    A day laborer from Mexico, he has a severely infected tooth. "I tried to find help," he says through an interpreter. "I went door to door for a doctor, but no one would help."

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    Finally, his sister suggested the right door: Samaritan House Clinic. He will be examined here, in a low-slung, nondescript building in San Mateo, because he meets the clinic's three prerequisites. He is indigent, has no health insurance, and lives within the geographical boundaries of Millbrae and San Carlos -- prospering suburbs between San Francisco and Silicon Valley.

    "Most communities have this population of invisible people," says William Schwartz, MD, a retired internist who co-founded the clinic in 1992. "You see these elegant Hillsborough addresses on the forms, but they're not paying the mortgage. They're living in a room over the garage."

    About two-thirds of the clinic's patients speak Spanish, though many other languages and cultures are represented. These are men and women who work as nannies, gardeners, and dishwashers, living as many as five to a room to keep up with the Bay Area's steep rents. Some are here legally; others are not. (Samaritan House makes no distinction.) Most have treatable medical problems such as diabetes, high blood pressure, or tuberculosis that become emergencies if not caught early.

    Floriberto needs immediate attention. Schwartz will refer him to an outside dentist, for services not available at Samaritan House. The patient will return to the clinic a week later for a prescription of antibiotics and will receive ongoing dental care there for weeks.

    Samaritan House Clinic certainly isn't the only place in America that dispenses free health care, but its structure could make it a model for other communities. The clinic has a rotating staff of 25 to 30 doctors, plus at least 15 registered nurses, 12 clerks, and 15 interpreters. Yet only three positions are paid, and one of them is half time. The rest are volunteers, and most of them are retired.

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