Skip to content

50+: Live Better, Longer

Rolling Stones: How They Keep Rockin'

Are there health secrets that let these aging rock stars strut across stages year after year?
Font Size
A
A
A
By
WebMD Feature
Reviewed by Louise Chang, MD

Maybe they're still seeking satisfaction. But time is definitely on their side.

The Rolling Stones are still one of the world's biggest rock and roll bands. They've got the record-setting concert grosses and Super Bowl performance credit to prove it.

Recommended Related to Healthy Seniors

Keeping Seniors Safe in Their Own Homes

Does your home seem less accommodating than it used to? Join the club. That tends to happen as we age. Toilets are suddenly too low, cabinets too high, and steps and loose rugs make getting around perilous, especially if you have stiff, arthritic joints. Karen Kassik discovered this in 2002, when she brought her then 66-year-old mother to live in her two-bedroom home in Winter Park, Fla. "I found out very quickly how inadequate this little house was," she recalls. Kassik, 45, used her background...

Read the Keeping Seniors Safe in Their Own Homes article > >

Sure, the band's been around since 1962, and three of its members are in their 60s. But all the jokes about walkers and dentures are getting a bit, well, old. Here are a few post-Super Bowl stats on Mick Jagger for you, courtesy of the British tabloid the Daily Express:

Age: 62. Weight: 140 pounds. Waist size: 28 inches. Distance he struts or sprints in a typical stadium show: about 12 miles.

What's all the more remarkable is that the Stones are not only the longest-running rock group in America but also its some of its most infamous bad boys. Along with some great albums, their legacy includes a long trail of dead or burned-out band members, wives, and groupies who just couldn't keep up with their rock-and-roll lifestyle.

Changing Face of Aging

How does Sir Mick stay in such amazing shape? How does Keith Richards even stay alive -- and doesn't that contradict everything we've been told about how to stay healthy in our senior years? Why haven't the Stones retired to an island somewhere? And what keeps the fans coming out in droves, year after year, to a band that's past its prime?

The answers, it appears, tell us a lot about the changing (but puffy-lipped) face of aging today. To their legions of baby boomer fans, the Stones symbolize their own potential in their later years -- and the possibility of redemption for youthful indiscretions.

"People are being told you can't teach an old dog new tricks, you're over the hill, it's time to lower your expectations of yourself," says Gene Cohen, MD, PhD, a leading aging researcher and author of The Mature Mind. "Now increasingly we're seeing people who still keep their expectations high. It pumps a lot of people up to see that the Stones can still do it."

1 | 2 | 3 | 4

Today on WebMD

blueberries
Eating for a longer, healthier life.
romantic couple
Dr. Ruth’s bedroom tips for long-term couples.
 
womans finger tied with string
Learn how we remember, and why we forget.
man reviewing building plans
Do you know how to stay healthy as you age?
 
fast healthy snack ideas
Article
how healthy is your mouth
Tool
 
dog on couch
Tool
doctor holding syringe
Slideshow
 
champagne toast
Slideshow
Two women wearing white leotards back to back
Quiz
 
Man feeding woman
Slideshow
two senior women laughing
Article