Skip to content

50+: Live Better, Longer

6 Yoga Poses That Age Well

Font Size
A
A
A
By Katherine Tweed
WebMD Feature

You can do yoga at any age -- really! It's just a matter of picking what type of yoga you do and working within your abilities.

It might even help you age better, keeping you flexible and building strength through low-impact moves.

Recommended Related to Healthy Seniors

Health Highlights: September, Healthy Aging Month

Each issue, WebMD the Magazine's "Health Highlights" focuses on a national health theme for the month with expert tips, reader comments, and eye-catching factoids. September is Healthy Aging month – follow these tips to stay at your peak! 1. Get moving Exercise regularly to maintain a healthy body and brain. 2. Stay social Take a class, volunteer, play games, see old friends, and make new ones. 3. Bulk up Eat beans and other high-fiber foods for digestive and heart health...

Read the Health Highlights: September, Healthy Aging Month article > >

“We lose about a half-pound of muscle per year for each year we’re not regularly engaged in resistance training,” says Jessica Matthews, assistant professor of exercise science at Miramar College in San Diego. Strength training also helps keep your bones strong.

Yoga is a great option because it does not require specialized equipment and can be done anywhere. Matthews says her yoga classes are filled with people of all ages and skill levels, and she has seen more older adults embrace the practice in recent years.

“One of the most important things is taking great care to understand what your body needs,” Matthews says. If you have arthritis, limited mobility, or other health issues, she says, there is a modification for almost every yoga pose to accommodate your physical needs.

Whether it’s at a yoga studio or community center or in your home, yoga is a great way to gently build your endurance while also fostering a mind-body connection.

Here are six poses Matthews suggests to get started:

1. Tree Pose

Tree pose helps to improve balance, Matthews says, which can help prevent falls.

  • Stand with your legs together and your arms straight over your head, palms together.
  • Raise your right leg slightly off the ground so that the toes are still on the ground and your heel is touching the inside part of your ankle.
  • Balance for 20 to 30 seconds if possible.
  • Repeat with the other leg. Hold onto something if necessary.

As you gain balance, draw your raised foot upward, resting the sole of your foot on the inside of the lower leg.

Eventually, work toward having your raised leg bent, with the foot resting on the inside of the opposite leg above your knee.

1 | 2 | 3

Today on WebMD

blueberries
Eating for a longer, healthier life.
romantic couple
Dr. Ruth’s bedroom tips for long-term couples.
 
womans finger tied with string
Learn how we remember, and why we forget.
man reviewing building plans
Do you know how to stay healthy as you age?
 
fast healthy snack ideas
Article
how healthy is your mouth
Tool
 
dog on couch
Tool
doctor holding syringe
Slideshow
 
champagne toast
Slideshow
Two women wearing white leotards back to back
Quiz
 
Man feeding woman
Slideshow
two senior women laughing
Article