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50+: Live Better, Longer

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Caregiving Tips to Keep Your Loved One Healthy

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    You can play a big role in keeping your loved one healthy. Follow these caregiving tips to make sure he's feeling his best.

    Medical care. Make sure your loved one gets to all his doctor appointments. Go to some of them with him so you can keep tabs on treatment and be an advocate for him.

    Recommended Related to Healthy Seniors

    Myths About Exercise and Older Adults

    Have you given up on exercise? A lot of older people do -- just one out of four people between the ages of 65 and 74 exercises regularly. Many people assume that they're too out-of-shape, or sick, or tired, or just plain old to exercise. They're wrong. "Exercise is almost always good for people of any age," says Chhanda Dutta, PhD, chief of the Clinical Gerontology Branch at the National Institute on Aging. Exercise can help make you stronger, prevent bone loss, improve balance and coordination,...

    Read the Myths About Exercise and Older Adults article > >

    Come up with a list of questions and concerns to discuss with the doctor beforehand. Have you noticed any new symptoms? Are any medications causing side effects? You may notice things that your loved one doesn't realize or forgets to ask about.

    Medication safety. Many seniors take a lot of medicines. It's easy to get confused, skipping a dose of one drug and taking a double dose of another. You can simplify the process.

    Get a large, easy-to-read weekly pillbox and help set it up. Use timers or alarms to remind your loved one to take medicine. And if his medicine schedule is just too complicated, ask his doctor if he can simplify it by using different drugs or dosages.

    Physical activity. Encourage your loved one to stay active. Exercise can improve his health, strength, sleep, and mood and lower the risk of falls.

    Try short walks around the neighborhood or take swims at the community pool. If that doesn't appeal, encourage an activity like gardening. Of course, it's always a good idea to check with your loved one's doctor before you start any sort of formal exercise program.

    Mental health. Watch for signs of depression and anxiety, and don't assume that problems will get better on their own. You can talk to your loved one's doctor about getting help from a therapist.

    Good nutrition. Encourage your loved one to eat a healthy diet. When you shop, choose nutritious foods that are easy to prepare.

    You and other caregivers can bring over frozen meals that you've made for reheating in the microwave or oven. Just make sure they're clearly labeled and dated. You should also take a look in the fridge and cabinets to make sure that your loved one isn't at risk of eating food that's gone bad.

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