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Getting Fit For Life

(continued)

How to Find Out More

Local gyms, universities, or hospitals might be able to help you find a teacher or program that works for you. You can also check with nearby churches or synagogues, senior and civic centers, parks, recreation associations, YMCAs, YWCAs, or even area shopping malls for exercise, wellness, or walking programs.

Looking for a safe exercise program? The National Institute on Aging (NIA) publishes Exercise:A Guide from the National Institute on Aging. This free 80-page booklet has instructions and drawings for many strength, balance, and stretching exercises you can do at home. Will they work? Scientific research supported by the NIA helped experts develop these exercises so they should help you if you do them as described. You can get the guide in English or Spanish. In addition, the NIA has a 48-minute exercise video for $7. You can order the video from the NIA Information Center.

Many organizations have information for older people about physical activity and exercise. The following list will help you get started:

American College of Sports Medicine
P.O. Box 1440
Indianapolis, IN 46206-1440
317-637-9200
www.acsm.org

American Physical Therapy Association
1111 North Fairfax Street
Alexandria. VA 22314-1488
800-999-2782
www.apta.org

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
1600 Clifton Road
Atlanta, GA 30333
800-311-3435
www.cdc.gov

Fifty-Plus Lifelong Fitness
P.O. Box 20230
Stanford , CA 94309
650-843-1750
www.50plus.org

MedlinePlus
"Exercise for Seniors"
"Exercise and Physical Fitness"
www.medlineplus.gov

The President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports
200 Independence Avenue, SW
Room 738-H, Dept. W
Washington, DC 20201-0004
202-690-9000
http://fitness.gov

Small Steps
www.smallstep.gov

Visit NIHSeniorHealth (www.nihseniorhealth.gov), a senior-friendly Web site from the National Institute on Aging and the National Library of Medicine. This site features popular health topics, including exercise, for older adults. It has large type and a "talking" feature that reads the text aloud.

The National Institute on Aging (NIA) distributes Age Pages and other materials on a wide range of topics related to health and aging. Some are in Spanish as well as English. You can order any of these publications including the exercise book and video or a list of free publications online at www.niapublications.org, or contact:

NIA Information Center
P.O. Box 8057
Gaithersburg, MD 20898-8057
800-222-2225
TTY: 800-222-4225
www.nia.nih.gov

National Institute on Aging
U. S. Department of Health and Human Services
National Institutes of Health
May 2004
Web page last updated: December 30, 2005

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WebMD Public Information from the U.S. National Institutes of Health

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