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    Body, Mind Workouts May Help Seniors Stay Sharp

    Small steps, including stretching, watching educational DVDs, reaped rewards

    WebMD News from HealthDay

    By Denise Mann

    HealthDay Reporter

    MONDAY, April 1 (HealthDay News) -- A little exercise and some mental stimulation may go a long way toward helping seniors stay sharp, a new, small study suggests.

    Researchers found the memory and thinking skills of 126 inactive older adults improved after they were assigned daily activities designed to engage their brains and their bodies.

    "The good news is that one plus one equals three," said Dr. Richard Isaacson, director of the Alzheimer's division at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, who was not involved in the study.

    The take-home point is that making small changes in physical and mental activity has led to positive changes in memory and thinking skills, Isaacson said.

    Learning a few extra words in a foreign language and walking several times a week, for example, will pay off in a few months, he noted.

    "You don't have to run a marathon to be fit, and you don't have to become fluent in a foreign language to remain sharp as you age," he said.

    For the study, published online April 1 in JAMA Internal Medicine, Deborah Barnes, from the University of California, San Francisco, and colleagues divided the participants, who were 65 or older (average age 73), into four groups. Three days a week for three months, all engaged in some type of mental stimulation one hour daily and some physical activity for an hour daily.

    More rigorous options included intensive brain-training computer games and dance-based aerobics. Other participants, who were followed as "controls," watched educational DVDs on arts, history and science, or participated in a stretching and toning class.

    All study participants said their memory or thinking skills had declined before the study began, but all showed improvements in memory and thinking skills at the end of the study period, no matter what activities they performed, the study showed.

    Dr. Sam Gandy, associate director of the Mt. Sinai Alzheimer's Disease Research Center in New York City, wasn't surprised by the findings.

    "Maintaining both an active physical lifestyle and an active mental lifestyle has been shown to have cognitive [mental] benefits that may include delaying or preventing Alzheimer's disease," Gandy said.

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