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Light and Nutritious Lunches continued...

Tomato Crab Bisque. Sounds complicated but this soup is a cinch. Saute a chopped onion, red bell pepper, and a few garlic cloves in a little olive oil. Add two 28-ounce cans of low-sodium fire-roasted tomatoes, 2 cups of low-fat milk, and one 6-ounce can of drained crabmeat. Heat thoroughly on medium low (do not boil). This soothing bisque is packed with antioxidant-rich veggies, including lycopene in the tomatoes, and calcium and vitamin D in the milk.

Grown-Up Grilled Cheese Sandwich. Layer thinly sliced pears or apples, your favorite sliced cheese, and basil or sage on some crusty rye bread. Use cooking spray on the outside of both slices of bread and brown lightly on both sides in a sauté pan. The fruit and cheese add fiber, calcium, protein, and important vitamins to your diet. Rye bread is whole grain, and according to a recent study, it may be more effective than laxatives in relieving mild constipation.

Delicious Healthy Dinners

Pistachio Crusted Salmon. Here is an easy way to eat fatty fish twice a week for heart health. Paint a salmon filet with a thin layer of honey mustard, and top with a combination of bread crumbs, parsley, and chopped pistachios. Broil in toaster oven or the regular oven for 10 to 15 minutes. Salmon is rich in heart-healthy omega 3 fatty acids. The pistachios add natural fiber, antioxidants, and protein. Complement this delicious dish with whole-grain brown rice and sautéed spinach. Spinach tops the list of super foods rich in disease-fighting phytochemicals, iron, folate, lutein, and zeaxanthin.

Maple Glazed Pork Tenderloin. Cut a pork tenderloin into 1-inch slices and brown the slices in a nonstick skillet on high heat, about 2 minutes per side. Mix 2 tablespoons maple syrup, 2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar, and 2 teaspoons grainy mustard. Add to browned pork slices, cover, reduce heat and simmer 2 to 3 minutes. Serve it with a baked sweet potato, an excellent source of beta carotene, and a very good source of vitamin C, manganese, fiber, potassium, and iron. Pork tenderloin is a lean source of protein. It rivals the chicken breast as one of the leanest meats available, and is a good source of vitamin B12 and iron. For diabetic people, you can delete the maple syrup and still have a tasty dish.

Chicken Divan. Poach four boneless chicken halves in simmering water for 7 to 8 minutes. Drain, chop the chicken, and reserve liquid separately. Mix a can of fat-free cream of chicken soup with 1/2 cup light mayonnaise, 1/2 to 3/4 cup poaching liquid, and 1 teaspoon curry. In a casserole dish, layer broccoli and chicken. Cover with sauce and bake 30 minutes in 350 oven. Lean chicken breasts are a great source of nutritious and satisfying protein. Topped with broccoli, this dish adds fiber, vitamins C, K, A, folate, potassium, and cancer-fighting sulforaphane.