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Advance Directive: What to Include - Topic Overview

A living will and a medical power of attorney are types of advance directives. These forms describe the kinds of medical care you want to receive if you're badly hurt or have a serious illness that keeps you from saying what you want. A medical power of attorney lets you name a person to be your health care agent. He or she can make decisions for you if you can't speak for yourself.

Forms are different in each state, so be sure you get the right ones for where you live. In some states, the forms may ask you to address certain issues, or they may be more flexible.

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It may be hard to know what to include in your advance directive. Take your time, and use the questions below to help you get started.

Who do you want to make your health care decisions for you?

  • Do you have a person in mind, such as your partner, a close friend, or your doctor? (In some states, your treating doctor can't be your health care agent.)
  • Can you talk to this person about the kinds of treatments you do or don't want to have?
  • Does this put too much pressure on the person to make decisions for you? Do you think that he or she will be able to do what you ask?
  • Do you think that your friends, your family, and others will support your decisions?

Do you know enough about the kinds of treatments that can help keep you alive?

  • Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is used if your heart has stopped.
  • A breathing machine that pumps air into your lungs through a tube is used if you can't breathe on your own.
  • Dialysis is used if your kidneys stop working.
  • A feeding tube or an intravenous (IV) line is used to provide food and fluids if you can't eat or drink.
  • Antibiotics are medicines used to treat serious infections.

How do you feel about the use of life support if you:

  • Have a serious illness that can't be cured?
  • Are in a coma and there is little chance that you'll come out of it?
  • Have a long-term illness that gets worse over time and doesn't get better?

What concerns you the most?

  • Are you worried that you'll have pain or be kept alive on machines?
  • Are you worried that you'll lose your ability to function and live on your own or that you'll be a burden to your family?
  • Are there things that scare you? Include your fears or concerns in your advance directive.

What does quality of life mean to you?

  • Do you want to be able to function and live on your own?
  • Are you okay with living in a hospital or nursing home?
  • Are you okay with being kept alive by machines?
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WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

Last Updated: December 29, 2011
This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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