Find Information About:

Drugs & Supplements

Get information and reviews on prescription drugs, over-the-counter medications, vitamins, and supplements. Search by name or medical condition.

Pill Identifier
WebMD

Pill Identifier

Having trouble identifying your pills?

Enter the shape, color, or imprint of your prescription or OTC drug. Our pill identification tool will display pictures that you can compare to your pill.

Get Started
My Medicine
WebMD

My Medicine

Save your medicine, check interactions, sign up for FDA alerts, create family profiles and more.

Get Started

WebMD Health Experts and Community

Talk to health experts and other people like you in WebMD's Communities. It's a safe forum where you can create or participate in support groups and discussions about health topics that interest you.

  • Second Opinion
    WebMD

    Second Opinion

    Read expert perspectives on popular health topics.

  • Community
    WebMD

    Community

    Connect with people like you, and get expert guidance on living a healthy life.

Got a health question? Get answers provided by leading organizations, doctors, and experts.

Get Answers

Sign up to receive WebMD's award-winning content delivered to your inbox.

Sign Up

50+: Live Better, Longer

Font Size
A
A
A

Writing an Advance Directive - Topic Overview

What is an advance directive?

An advance directive is a form that you fill out to describe the kinds of medical care you want to have if something happens to you and you can't speak for yourself. It tells your family and your doctor what to do if you're badly hurt or have a serious illness that keeps you from saying what you want.

What are the different types?

There are two main types of advance directives:

  • A living will tells your family and your doctor what kinds of treatment you want to receive as you near the end of your life and if you can no longer speak for yourself. A living will is also called a treatment directive.
  • A medical power of attorney lets you name a person to make treatment decisions for you when you can't speak for yourself. This person is called a health care agent or health care proxy.

As long as you can still make your own decisions, your advance directive won't be used. You can stop or say "no" to treatment at any time.

How do you write an advance directive?

As you prepare your advance directive, you'll need to follow these four important steps:

  1. Get the living will and medical power of attorney forms for your state, or use a universal form that has been approved by many states. In general, doctors will respect your wishes even if you have a form from a different state.
  2. Choose your health care agent. This should be a person you trust to make decisions for you.
  3. Fill out the forms, and have them witnessed as your state requires.
  4. Give copies to your family, your doctor, and your health care agent.

You can get the forms in a doctor's office, hospital, law office, state or local office for the aging, senior center, nursing home, or online.

When you write your advance directive, think about the kinds of treatments that you do or don't want to receive if you get seriously hurt or ill.

Consider whether you want to:

  • Receive cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) if your heart stops.
  • Be on a machine that pumps air into your lungs through a tube if you can't breathe on your own.
  • Be on a machine that cleans your blood if your kidneys stop working.
  • Be fed or get fluids through a tube if you can't eat or drink.
  • Take medicines to treat serious infections.

These are tough choices to make, but you don't have to make them alone. Take your time. Share your questions or concerns about what to include in your advance directive with your doctor or nurse, your lawyer, your family, or a friend.

1 | 2
Next Article:

Today on WebMD

blueberries
Eating for a longer, healthier life.
woman biking
How to stay vital in your 50s and beyond.
 
womans finger tied with string
Learn how we remember, and why we forget.
man reviewing building plans
Do you know how to stay healthy as you age?
 
fast healthy snack ideas
Article
how healthy is your mouth
Tool
 
dog on couch
Tool
doctor holding syringe
Slideshow
 
champagne toast
Slideshow
Two women wearing white leotards back to back
Quiz
 
Man feeding woman
Slideshow
two senior women laughing
Article