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Atrial Fibrillation Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Atrial Fibrillation

  1. What Happens During Surgical Ablation?

    This article is about surgical ablation for atrial fibrillation. It talks about the different types of this surgery and how you will prepare and recover.

  2. What Happens During Catheter Ablation for AFib?

    Learn what happens before, during, and after this nonsurgical procedure that can treat atrial fibrillation. See who should get this procedure and recovery information.

  3. Atrial Fibrillation and Heart Disease

    Information on atrial fibrillation and abnormal heartbeat, including the causes, symptoms, and treatments.

  4. When Someone With AFib Has Trouble

    How can you recognize an AFib episode, a heart attack, or a stroke? And how can you help? Get answers.

  5. Alcohol and AFib Risks: Is It Safe to Drink?

    Drinking certain kinds of alcohol daily can raise your chances of getting atrial fibrillation (AFib), a heart condition that makes your heart beat really fast.

  6. Topic Overview

    What is atrial fibrillation?Atrial fibrillation (say “A - tree - uhl fih - bruh - LAY - shun”) is an irregular heart rhythm (arrhythmia) that starts in the upper parts (atria) of the heart. Normally, the heart beats in a strong, steady rhythm. In atrial fibrillation, a problem with the heart’s electrical system causes the atria to quiver, or fibrillate. The quivering upsets the normal rhythm

  7. Beta-Blockers for Atrial Fibrillation

    Drug details for Beta-blockers for atrial fibrillation.

  8. Heart Arrhythmias and Exercise - Topic Overview

    If you have an irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia), ask your doctor what type and level of exercise is safe for you. Regular activity can help keep your heart and body healthy.The type and amount of exercise that is allowable will vary depending on the cause of your abnormal heart rhythm and whether you have other forms of heart disease. If your irregular heartbeat is caused by another type of heart disease (such as cardiomyopathy or a valve problem), you may need to limit your activity because of the other heart disease.Before you start a new exercise program or change your current exercise program:Talk with your doctor. He or she may do a physical exam, an electrocardiogram (EKG or ECG), and possibly a stress ECG test to assess what level of activity your heart can handle. Make an exercise plan together with your doctor. An exercise program usually consists of stretching, activities that increase your heart rate (aerobic exercise), and strength training (lifting light weights). Make

  9. Atrial Fibrillation - Symptoms

    Symptoms of atrial fibrillation include:Heart palpitations.Irregular pulse.Shortness of breath, especially during physical activity or emotional stress.Weakness, fatigue.Dizziness, confusion.Lightheadedness or fainting (syncope).Chest pain (angina).Atrial fibrillation is often discovered during routine medical checkups, because many people do not have symptoms. Others may notice an irregular ...

  10. Pacemaker for Atrial Fibrillation

    A pacemaker is a battery - powered device about the size of a pocket watch that sends weak electrical impulses to “set a pace” so that the heart is able to maintain a regular heartbeat. There are two basic types of pacemakers:Single - chamber pacemakers stimulate one chamber of the heart, either an atrium or more often a ventricle. Dual - chamber pacemakers send electrical impulses to both the

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