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Heart Arrhythmias and Exercise - Topic Overview

If you have an irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia), ask your doctor what type and level of exercise is safe for you. Regular activity can help keep your heart and body healthy.

The type and amount of exercise that is allowable will vary depending on the cause of your abnormal heart rhythm and whether you have other forms of heart disease. If your irregular heartbeat is caused by another type of heart disease (such as cardiomyopathy or a valve problem), you may need to limit your activity because of the other heart disease.

Before you start a new exercise program or change your current exercise program:

  • Talk with your doctor. He or she may do a physical exam, an electrocardiogram (EKG or ECG), and possibly a stress ECG test to assess what level of activity your heart can handle.
  • Make an exercise plan together with your doctor. An exercise program usually consists of stretching, activities that increase your heart rate (aerobic exercise), and strength training (lifting light weights).
  • Make a list of questions to discuss with your doctor. Do this before your appointment. For some sample questions, see this form about planning to be more active when you have a chronic disease(What is a PDF document?).
  • Consider joining a health club, walking group, or YMCA. Senior centers often offer exercise programs.
  • Learn how to check your heart rate. Learn about taking a pulse slideshow.gif. Your doctor can tell you how fast your pulse (target heart rate) should be when you exercise.
  • Know how to exercise safely with a cardiac device such as a pacemaker or ICD. If you have a cardiac device, your doctor might advise you not to take part in contact sports. Impacts during these sports could damage your device. Sports such as swimming, running, walking, tennis, golf, and bicycling are safer.
  • Know what symptoms could be a sign of a problem. For example, stop exercising and get some rest if you develop palpitations, chest pain, or dizziness or lightheadedness. Call 911 or other emergency services immediately if these symptoms don't go away.
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