Skip to content
My WebMD Sign In, Sign Up

Heart Disease Health Center

Font Size
A
A
A

Cardiac Rehabilitation and Coronary Artery Disease

Cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) is a program for people who have recently had a heart attack or heart surgery or who have other heart problems. Cardiac rehab is designed to help people recover more quickly and more fully from their heart attack or surgery, improve their health and quality of life, and return to their normal daily routine.

Cardiac rehab often involves a team of health professionals, including a cardiologist, nurses, exercise specialists, physical therapists, dietitians, and others.

Recommended Related to Heart Disease

Atherosclerosis: What’s Happening Inside Your Arteries?

Ever wish you could see inside your arteries? These blood vessels deliver oxygen-rich blood to every corner of our bodies. Maintaining the flow is essential to life and health. Atherosclerosis causes narrowing and hardening of the arteries, creating slowdowns in blood flow. Even worse, atherosclerosis can trigger sudden blood clots. Heart attacks and strokes are the often-deadly result. If we could see what was going on in our arteries, we might think twice about our lifestyle choices. Could...

Read the Atherosclerosis: What’s Happening Inside Your Arteries? article > >

Rehabilitation consists of carefully planned exercise, strength training, and proper nutrition, all of which are based on your personal level of fitness and the condition of your heart. Exercise is designed to help you regain your strength and improve your heart health. Education and support are also important components of a cardiac rehab program that may help you learn to deal with the stress and emotional issues of rehabilitation.

Besides improving your heart and muscle strength, cardiac rehabilitation may also help lower your cholesterol level, blood pressure, and weight, and it likely will improve your sense of well-being.

For more information, see the topic Cardiac Rehabilitation.

By Healthwise Staff
Primary Medical Reviewer E. Gregory Thompson, MD - Internal Medicine
Specialist Medical Reviewer John A. McPherson, MD, FACC, FSCAI - Cardiology
Last Revised May 10, 2010

WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

Last Updated: May 10, 2010
This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.

Today on WebMD

cholesterol lab test report
Article
Compressed heart
Article
 
Heart Foods Slideshow
Slideshow
Compressed heart
Article
 
empty football helmet
Article
doctor looking at xrays
Video
 
eating blueberries
Article
Simple Steps to Lower Cholesterol
Slideshow
 
Inside A Heart Attack
SLIDESHOW
Omega 3 Sources
SLIDESHOW
 
Salt Shockers
SLIDESHOW
lowering blood pressure
SLIDESHOW