Skip to content

Heart Disease Health Center

Font Size
A
A
A

Echocardiogram

How It Is Done continued...

A small amount of gel will be rubbed on the left side of your chest to help pick up the sound waves. A small instrument (transducer) that looks like a microphone is pressed firmly against your chest and moved slowly back and forth. This instrument sends sound waves into the chest and picks up the echoes as they reflect off different parts of the heart. The echoes are sent to a video monitor that records pictures of your heart for later viewing and evaluation. The room is usually darkened to help the technician see the pictures on the monitor.

At times you will be asked to hold very still, breathe in and out very slowly, hold your breath, or lie on your left side. The transducer is usually moved to different areas on your chest that provide specific views of your heart.

The test usually takes from 30 to 60 minutes. When the test is over, the gel is wiped off and the electrodes are removed.

Exercise stress echocardiogram

An echo without activity or stress will be done before you start exercising. This is called the baseline, and after it is established you will exercise for a specific amount of time. You will either walk on a treadmill or pedal a stationary bicycle while being monitored by an EKG machine. To learn more, see Exercise Electrocardiogram.

You will then lie on a bed or table, and another echocardiogram will be done. At times you will be asked to hold very still, breathe in and out very slowly, hold your breath, or lie on your left side. The transducer is usually moved to different areas on your chest that provide specific views of your heart.

An exercise stress echo takes about 30 to 60 minutes.

Dobutamine stress echocardiogram

Sometimes medicine called dobutamine is used instead of exercise to stress your heart. For this test, you will lie on your back or left side on a bed or exam table, and a baseline echocardiogram will be done. EKG electrodes will be taped to your arms and legs to record your heart rate during the test.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9

WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

Last Updated: March 12, 2014
This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.

Today on WebMD

x-ray of human heart
A visual guide.
atrial fibrillation
Symptoms and causes.
 
heart rate graph
10 things to never do.
heart rate
Get the facts.
 
empty football helmet
Article
red wine
Video
 
eating blueberries
Article
Simple Steps to Lower Cholesterol
Slideshow
 
Inside A Heart Attack
SLIDESHOW
Omega 3 Sources
SLIDESHOW
 
Salt Shockers
SLIDESHOW
lowering blood pressure
SLIDESHOW