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Heart Disease and Beta-Blocker Therapy

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Beta-blockers are one of the most widely prescribed classes of drugs to treat hypertension (high blood pressure) and are a mainstay treatment of congestive heart failure. Beta-blockers work by blocking the effects of epinephrine (adrenaline) and slowing the heart's rate, thereby decreasing the heart’s demand for oxygen. Long-term use of beta-blockers helps manage chronic heart failure.

Examples of beta-blockers include:

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Why Are Beta-Blockers Prescribed?

Beta-blockers are often prescribed for these heart conditions:

In addition, beta-blockers are sometimes prescribed for glaucoma, migraine headaches, anxiety, certain types of tremors, and hyperthyroidism.

How Should I Take Beta-Blockers?

Beta-blockers can be taken in the morning, at meals, and at bedtime; taking them with food minimize side effects because absorption is slower. Follow the label directions on how often to take a beta-blocker. The number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and how long you need to take the medication will depend on your condition. Ask your doctor what to do if you miss a dose.

Beta-blockers should not be prescribed if you have low blood pressure or a slow pulse, because the further reduction in heart rate can cause dizziness and lightheadedness. If you have asthma or COPD, your doctor may not prescribe a beta-blocker because it may worsen symptoms. If you have heart failure and severe lung congestion, your doctor will treat your congestion before prescribing a beta-blocker.

While you are taking a beta-blocker, you may need to record your pulse every day. If your pulse is slower than it should be, contact your doctor about taking your beta-blocker that day.

Never stop taking a beta-blocker without speaking to your doctor first, even if you feel that it is not working. Sudden withdrawal can worsen angina and cause heart attacks.

What Are the Side Effects of Beta-Blockers?

Side effects of beta-blockers include:

Side effects of beta-blockers are common and usually mild, but if these symptoms persist or become severe, contact your doctor:

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