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Heart Disease Health Center

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Heart Disease and the Echocardiogram

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How Should I Prepare for the Echocardiogram?

On the day of the echocardiogram, eat and drink as you normally would. Take all of your medications at the usual times, as prescribed by your doctor.

What Happens During the Echocardiogram?

During an echocardiogram, you will be given a hospital gown to wear. You will be asked to remove your clothing from the waist up. A cardiac sonographer will place three electrodes (small, flat, sticky patches) on your chest. The electrodes are attached to an electrocardiograph monitor (ECG or EKG) that charts your heart's electrical activity.

The sonographer will ask you to lie on your left side on an exam table. He or she will place a wand (called a sound-wave transducer) on several areas of your chest. The wand will have a small amount of gel on the end, which will not harm your skin. The gel is used to help produce clearer pictures.

Sounds are part of the Doppler signal. You may or may not hear the sounds during the test. You may be asked to change positions several times during the exam in order for the sonographer to take pictures of different areas of your heart. You may also be asked to hold your breath at times during the exam.

You should feel no major discomfort during the test, although you may feel coolness from the gel on the transducer and a slight pressure of the transducer on your chest.

The test will take about 40 minutes. After the test, you can get dressed and go about your daily activities. Your doctor will discuss the test results with you.

What Should I Do to Prepare for a Stress Echocardiogram?

If you are scheduled for a dobutamine stress echo AND you have a pacemaker, please contact your doctor for specific instructions. Your device may need to be checked before the test.

On the day of the stress echocardiogram, do not eat or drink anything except water for four hours before the test. Do not drink or eat caffeinated products (cola, chocolate, coffee, tea) for 24 hours before the test. Caffeine will interfere with the results of your test. Do not take any over-the-counter medications that contain caffeine for 24 hours before the test. Ask your doctor, pharmacist, or nurse if you have questions about medications that may contain caffeine.

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