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Heart Disease and Nitrates

Nitrates are vasodilators that are used to treat angina in people with coronary artery disease or chest pain caused by blocked blood vessels of the heart. They work to control angina by relaxing the coronary arteries so blood can flow more easily to the heart.  

Nitrates also can be used with another blood pressure medication (hydralazine) to treat congestive heart failure. Vasodilators include:

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How Should I Take Nitrates?

Follow the label directions on when and how to take nitrates. Take these drugs with or without meals. Medication tolerance can develop with these medications; this leads to their ineffectiveness. Talk with your doctor so you understand how to take these medications during the day. The number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and how long you need to take the medications will depend on your condition.

While taking these drugs, have your blood pressure checked regularly, as advised by your doctor.

Keep all appointments with your doctor and the laboratory so that your response to the drug can be monitored.

What Are the Side Effects of Nitrates?

Nitrates may cause dizziness.  Other side effects of nitrates include:

  • Headache; rapid, irregular, or pounding heartbeat; this is very common with continuous use but resolves after the first few weeks of treatment. If they persist, contact your doctor or nurse.
  • Flushing of the face or neck. Contact your doctor or nurse if these side effects are persistent or severe.
  • Low blood pressure.

 You should not take these medications if you:

  • Have severe allergic reactions to medications containing nitroglycerin or isosorbide in the past
  • Take a phosphodiesterase inhibitors such as Viagra (sildenafil),  Levitra (vardenafil), or Cialis (tadalafil)
  • Have narrow-angle glaucoma

 

WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by James Beckerman, MD, FACC on October 30, 2013
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