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    Heart Failure Overview

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    What Are the Types of Heart Failure?

    Systolic dysfunction (or systolic heart failure) occurs when the heart muscle doesn't contract with enough force, so there is less oxygen-rich blood that is pumped throughout the body.

    Diastolic dysfunction (or diastolic heart failure) occurs when the heart contracts normally, but the ventricle -- the main pumping chamber -- does not relax properly, reducing the amount of blood that can enter the heart and raising blood pressure in the lungs.

    A test called the ejection fraction (EF) is used to measure how well your heart pumps with each beat to help determine if systolic or diastolic dysfunction is present. The ejection fraction is a measure of the percentage of blood that your heart pumps out with each beat. Your doctor can discuss which condition you have.

    In patients with systolic heart failure, the ejection fraction is less than 40%. Imaging studies such as an echocardiogram (heart ultrasound) show the heart is enlarged and pumps out less than a normal amount of blood with each beat.

    In contrast, patients with diastolic heart failure usually have a normal ejection fraction and normal heart pumping capability, but an echocardiogram shows that the heart does not fill up with blood properly during the heart relaxation phase that occurs between beats.

    Stages of Heart Failure

    In 2001, the American Heart Association (AHA) and American College of Cardiology (ACC) developed the "Stages of Heart Failure." These stages, which were updated in 2005, will help you understand that heart failure is often a progressive condition and can worsen over time. They will also help you understand why a new medication was added to your treatment plan and may help you understand why lifestyle changes and other treatments are needed.

    The stages classified by the AHA and ACC are different than the New York Heart Association (NYHA) clinical classifications of heart failure that rank patients as class I-II-III-IV, according to the degree of symptoms or functional limits. Ask your doctor what stage of heart failure you are in.

    Check the table below to see if your therapy matches what the AHA and ACC recommend. Note that you cannot go backward in stage, only forward.

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