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    Heart Failure Symptoms

    The symptoms of heart failure are related to the changes that occur to your heart and body, and may be mild, moderate, or severe, depending on how weak your heart is. The symptoms can include:

    • Congested lungs. Fluid backup in the lungs can cause shortness of breath with exercise or difficulty breathing at rest or when lying flat in bed. Lung congestion also causes a dry, hacking cough or wheezing.
    • Fluid and water retention. Less blood to your kidneys causes fluid and water retention, resulting in swollen ankles, legs, and abdomen (called edema) and weight gain. Symptoms may cause an increased need to urinate during the night. Bloating in your stomach may cause a loss of appetite or nausea.
    • Dizziness, fatigue, and weakness. Less blood to your major organs and muscles makes you feel tired and weak. Less blood to the brain can cause dizziness or confusion.
    • Rapid or irregular heartbeats. The heart beats faster to pump enough blood to the body. This causes a fast or irregular heartbeat.

    If you have heart failure, you may have one or all of these symptoms or you may have none of them. In addition, your symptoms may not be related to how weak your heart is; you may have many symptoms, but your heart function may be only mildly weakened. Or you may have a more severely damaged heart but have no symptoms.

    Recommended Related to Heart Failure

    Understanding Heart Failure -- Prevention

    Drug therapy to lower blood pressure has been shown to reduce heart failure rates by 40%-60%. Reducing blockages in the coronary arteries with anti-cholesterol drugs has been shown to reduce heart failure rates by 30%. Early diagnosis and treatment of heart-valve abnormalities can prevent heart failure caused by chronic volume overload of the heart's left chamber.

    Read the Understanding Heart Failure -- Prevention article > >

    If you have any of the above listed symptoms, be sure to see a doctor. Also, because heart failure can occur without symptoms, be sure to get a yearly doctor check-up so that any problems can be detected and treated.

    WebMD Medical Reference

    Reviewed by James Beckerman, MD, FACC on January 28, 2015

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