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Cardiac Cachexia - Topic Overview

Cardiac cachexia is unintentional severe weight loss caused by heart disease. The weight loss might be life-threatening.

It can happen to people who have severe heart failure. Even with a very good appetite and high calorie intake, some people lose muscle mass.

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Cardiac cachexia can require supplemental nutrition.

How does heart failure cause it?

  • Heart failure may cause blood to back up into the liver and intestines, and they may swell. This swelling can lead to nausea and decreased appetite.
  • Swelling of the intestines may not allow for adequate absorption of nutrients from the food you eat.
  • Heart failure may force you to work harder to breathe and cause your body temperature to increase. Both of these conditions burn calories.
  • In people with severe heart failure, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and other signaling molecules in the bloodstream called cytokines can increase the metabolic rate of the tissues, thus burning more calories.

    This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http:// cancer .gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.

    WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

    Last Updated: March 12, 2014
    This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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