Skip to content

Heart Failure Health Center

Font Size

Ventricular Assist Device (VAD) for Heart Failure - Topic Overview

A ventricular assist device (VAD) camera.gif, also known as a heart pump, is a mechanical device that helps pump blood from the heart to the rest of your body.

A VAD can be implanted in the chest or worn outside the body. If it is implanted, surgery is done to place it in the chest area. The pump part of the VAD is placed in a small space in your upper abdomen. Batteries that power the pump are usually worn on a belt or pouch outside your body. After the VAD has been implanted, your doctor will make another small incision in your side to connect the electrical wires that power the device.

A VAD can help pump blood from the left side, right side, or both sides of your heart, depending on your type of heart failure.

How does it work?

A VAD helps pump blood when the heart is not able to pump enough blood on its own. It removes blood from your heart and pumps it to the rest of your body. This way, most of the blood that your heart would normally pump is pumped by the VAD instead. Most VADs have an automatic mode that adjusts to different levels of activity. For example, if you begin to walk, your VAD can increase how much blood it pumps.

Why is it used?

A VAD can be used as a temporary or long-term treatment for severe heart failure. A VAD may be used for only a short time if a person's heart gets strong again and is able to pump blood well enough by itself. VADs are typically used to help people who are waiting for a heart transplant. In some cases, VADs can be used long-term along with other heart failure treatments like medicines.

What are the benefits?

VADs used before a heart transplant can help people live until they receive the transplant.

VADs used for long-term therapy may help lower the risk of death compared to medical treatment alone. And a VAD might help a person feel better and be able to do better with daily activities.

    1|2
    Next Article:

    Ventricular Assist Device (VAD) for Heart Failure Topics

    Today on WebMD

    Compressed heart
    Article
    Salt Shockers
    Slideshow
     
    Inside A Heart Attack
    Slideshow
    lowering blood pressure
    SLIDESHOW
     

    Mechanical Heart
    Article
    Omega 3 Overview Slideshow
    Slideshow
     
    Atrial Fibrillation Guide
    Slideshow
    Simple Steps to Lower Cholesterol
    Slideshow
     

    Compressed heart
    Article
    FAQ Heart Failure
    Article
     
    Cholesterol Confusion
    Health Check
    Resolved To Quit Smoking
    Slideshow
     

    WebMD Special Sections