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Heart Disease Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Heart Disease

  1. Cause

    Heart failure is caused by diseases or other factors that affect the pumping ability of the heart, specifically the left lower chamber (left ventricle). When the heart cannot pump well, it is called systolic heart failure. Things that affect how the heart pumps include:Coronary artery disease (CAD) and heart attack (most common causes).Damage from poorly controlled high blood pressure or ...

  2. Topic Overview

    What is heart failure?Heart failure means your heart muscle does not pump as much blood as your body needs. Failure does not mean that your heart has stopped. It means that your heart is not pumping as well as it should.Because your heart cannot pump well, your body tries to make up for it. To do this: Your body holds on to salt and water. This increases the amount of blood in your bloodstream. ..

  3. Heart Attack and Unstable Angina - Treatment for Complications

    In the past decade, angioplasty, also known as percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), has become a common procedure in large medical centers in the United States. Angioplasty is done during cardiac catheterization or coronary angiogram.During a cardiac catheterization, a tiny tube (called a catheter) is threaded through an artery of an arm or leg up into the heart and a dye that contains ...

  4. Heart Attack and Unstable Angina - End-of-Life Decisions

    Although treatment for a heart attack is increasingly successful at prolonging life and reducing complications and hospitalization, a heart attack can lead to progressive, fatal conditions, such as heart failure and abnormal heart rhythms (arrhythmias). Many important end - of - life decisions can be made while you are active and able to communicate your wishes.When you are diagnosed with a heart

  5. Coronary Artery Disease - Cause

    Coronary artery disease is caused by the buildup of plaque on the inside of your coronary arteries. In most people, plaque buildup begins early in life and gradually develops over a lifetime.2Coronary artery disease (CAD) typically begins when the inside walls of the coronary arteries are damaged, due to one or more underlying conditions, such as high cholesterol, high blood pressure, diabetes, ..

  6. Pacemaker for Heart Failure (Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy)

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) uses a special type of pacemaker called a biventricular pacemaker (say by-ven-TRICK-yuh-ler) to treat heart failure. This pacemaker sends electrical pulses to make the ventricles pump at the same time. A biventricular pacemaker is implanted in the chest, and it connects to three thin wires, called leads. The leads go into different chambers of your heart. If there is a problem with your heartbeat, the pacemaker sends a painless signal through the leads to fix the problem. The pacemaker also can speed up your heart if it is beating too slowly. In some cases, you may get a pacemaker that is combined with a device to shock your heartbeat back to a normal rhythm if it is dangerously fast. The device is called an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator, or ICD. It can prevent sudden death. Your doctor will put the pacemaker in your chest during minor surgery. You will not have open-chest surgery.Your doctor makes a small cut (incision) in your chest.

  7. Coronary Artery Disease - Exams and Tests

    To diagnose coronary artery disease (CAD), your health professional will complete a medical history and physical exam. Usually, the need for further testing depends on your risk factors and symptoms. Testing strategies also vary from doctor to doctor.If coronary artery disease is suspected, you may have tests to determine the diagnosis. The most common initial tests are electrocardiogram (EKG or .

  8. Coronary Artery Disease - Angioplasty

    Several nonsurgical procedures are used to treat coronary artery disease. They are called nonsurgical procedures because the repair is done through a catheter inserted into an artery, and neither a large incision nor general anesthesia are needed.Two such procedures, angioplasty (often combined with stenting) and atherectomy, are used to reopen blocked or narrowed coronary arteries. Angioplasty, .

  9. Coronary Artery Disease - Prevention

    From 1992 to 2002, the death rate from coronary artery disease (CAD) declined by 26% in the United States. This decline is attributed to the steps people are taking to prevent coronary artery disease, including lowering blood pressure and cholesterol, changing diet and exercise habits, quitting smoking, and improved medical care.3Coronary artery disease is caused by the buildup of plaque on the ..

  10. Coronary Artery Disease - Frequently Asked Questions

    Learning about coronary artery disease (CAD):What is CAD?What causes CAD?What are the symptoms of CAD?What increases my risk for CAD?What is my risk for having a heart attack?When do I need to see my doctor?Being diagnosed:What is important for my doctor to know about my condition?How will my doctor diagnose CAD?How can an electrocardiogram (EKG or ECG) help diagnose CAD?Should I have an ...

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