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Heart Disease Health Center

Fish Oil Supplements May Not Prevent Heart Trouble

They don't reduce the risk of heart attack, heart failure or death, researchers report
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WebMD News from HealthDay

By Steven Reinberg

HealthDay Reporter

WEDNESDAY, May 8 (HealthDay News) -- Although previous research has shown that omega-3 fatty acids may help those who have already had a heart attack or suffer from heart failure, a new study finds that the supplements do little to prevent cardiac trouble in people who have risk factors for heart disease.

Italian researchers reported that omega-3 fatty acid supplements did not reduce death from heart disease or heart attacks or strokes in this vulnerable group.

"Contrary to the expectations, adding supplemental omega-3 fatty acids does not have any specific advantage in a population that is considered at high risk of cardiovascular disease," said lead researcher Dr. Gianni Tognoni, from the Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche in Milan.

Tognoni said omega-3 fatty acids do seem to help prevent abnormal heart rhythms following a heart attack or heart failure. There appears, however, to be no value in taking the supplements to prevent heart disease, he added.

"Don't trust too much on drugs that attempt to mimic lifestyle [changes]," Tognoni said.

It's the usual recommendations that really ward off heart disease, he said, including not smoking, eating a healthy diet and getting exercise.

Study co-author Dr. Maria Carla Roncaglioni, head of the Laboratory of General Practice Research at the Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, added that "there is no need to add a long-term preventive treatment with omega-3 fatty acids in people with cardiovascular risk factors [that are controlled with] evidence-based treatments and healthy lifestyle -- particularly with regard to dietary habits."

The report was published in the May 9 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

One expert said the evidence on omega-3 fatty acids has been mixed.

"Some prior clinical trials have shown a beneficial effect of omega-3 fatty acids derived from fish -- also known as fish oil or n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids -- in patients with established cardiovascular disease or to prevent cardiovascular events in the general adult population," said Dr. Gregg Fonarow, a professor of cardiology at the University of California, Los Angeles. "However, other clinical trials have shown no benefit."

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