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    Pediatric Cardiomyopathy

    Important
    It is possible that the main title of the report Pediatric Cardiomyopathy is not the name you expected. Please check the synonyms listing to find the alternate name(s) and disorder subdivision(s) covered by this report.

    Synonyms

    • arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC)
    • asymmetrical septal hypertrophy
    • familial congestive cardiomyopathy
    • familial dilated cardiomyopathy (FDC)
    • hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM)
    • idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy
    • idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis
    • non-obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Disorder Subdivisions

    • arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (ARVD)
    • dilated cardiomyopathy
    • hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM)
    • restrictive cardiomyopathy

    General Discussion

    Pediatric cardiomyopathy is a rare heart condition that affects infants and children. Specifically, cardiomyopathy means disease of the heart muscle (myocardium). Several different types of cardiomyopathy exist and the specific symptoms vary from case to case. In some cases, no symptoms may be present (asymptomatic); in many cases, cardiomyopathy is a progressive condition that may result in an impaired ability of the heart to pump blood; fatigue; heart block; irregular heartbeats (tachycardia); and, potentially, heart failure and sudden cardiac death.

    Cardiomyopathy may be termed ischemic or nonischemic. Ischemic cardiomyopathy refers to cases that occur due to a lack of blood flow and oxygen (ischemia) to the heart. Such cases often result from hardening of the arteries (coronary artery disease). Nonischemic cardiomyopathy refers to cases that occur due to structural damage or malfunction of the heart muscle. Nearly all cases of pediatric cardiomyopathy are nonischemic. This report deals with nonischemic pediatric cardiomyopathy.

    Cardiomyopathy may also be termed primary or secondary. Primary cardiomyopathy refers to cases where cardiomyopathy occurs by itself or for unknown reasons (idiopathic). Secondary cardiomyopathy refers to cases where the disease occurs secondary to a known cause such as heart muscle inflammation (myocarditis) caused by viral or bacterial infections; exposure to certain toxins such as heavy metals or excessive alcohol use; or certain disorders that affect the heart and/or additional organs systems. According to the Pediatric Cardiomyopathy Registry, approximately 79 percent of pediatric cardiomyopathy cases occur for unknown reasons (idiopathic).

    Nonischemic cardiomyopathy may be further divided into four subtypes based upon the specific changes within the heart. These subtypes are: dilated, hypertrophic, restrictive and arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia.

    Resources

    American Heart Association
    7272 Greenville Avenue
    Dallas, TX 75231
    Tel: (214)784-7212
    Fax: (214)784-1307
    Tel: (800)242-8721
    Email: Review.personal.info@heart.org
    Internet: http://www.heart.org

    NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute
    P.O. Box 30105
    Bethesda, MD 20892-0105
    Tel: (301)592-8573
    Fax: (301)251-1223
    Email: nhlbiinfo@rover.nhlbi.nih.gov
    Internet: http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/

    Montgomery Heart Foundation for Cardiomyopathy
    1830 E. Monument St./Suite 7300
    Baltimore, MD 21205
    Tel: (402)502-2578
    Fax: (443)287-4109
    Email: njohnso5@jhmi.edu
    Internet: http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/cardiomyopathy/

    Cardiomyopathy Association
    Chiltern Court, Unit 10
    Asheridge Rd Ind
    Chesham, HP5 2PX
    United Kingdom
    Tel: 4401494791224
    Fax: 4401494797199
    Tel: 08000181024
    Email: info@cardiomyopathy.org
    Internet: http://www.cardiomyopathy.org

    Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Association
    322 Green Pond Rd
    P.O. Box 306
    Hibernia, NJ 07842
    USA
    Tel: (973)983-7429
    Fax: (973)983-7870
    Tel: (877)329-4262
    Email: support@4hcm.org
    Internet: http://www.4hcm.org

    Cardiac Arrhythmias Research and Education Foundation, Inc. (C.A.R.E)
    427 Fulton Street
    P.O. Box 69
    Seymour, WI 54165
    USA
    Fax: (920)833-7005
    Tel: (800)404-9500
    Email: care@careforhearts.org
    Internet: http://www.longqt.org or http://www.careforhearts.org

    Kids With Heart ~ National Association for Children's Heart Disorders, Inc.
    1578 Careful Dr.
    Green Bay, WI 54304
    Tel: (920)498-0058
    Fax: (920)498-0058
    Tel: (800)538-5390
    Email: michelle@kidswithheart.org
    Internet: http://www.kidswithheart.org

    Little Hearts, Inc.
    P.O. Box 171
    110 Court Street, Suite 3A
    Cromwell, CT 06416
    USA
    Tel: (860)635-0006
    Fax: (860)635-0006
    Tel: (866)435-4673
    Email: info@littlehearts.org
    Internet: http://www.littlehearts.org

    Congenital Heart Information Network (C.H.I.N.)
    P.O. Box 3397
    Margate City, NJ 08402-0397
    Tel: (609)823-4507
    Fax: (609)822-1574
    Email: mb@tchin.org
    Internet: http://www.tchin.org

    Children's Cardiomyopathy Foundation
    PO Box 547
    Tenafly, NJ 07670
    USA
    Tel: (866)808-2873
    Fax: (201)227-7016
    Email: info@childrenscardiomyopathy.org
    Internet: http://www.childrenscardiomyopathy.org

    Genetic and Rare Diseases (GARD) Information Center
    PO Box 8126
    Gaithersburg, MD 20898-8126
    Tel: (301)251-4925
    Fax: (301)251-4911
    Tel: (888)205-2311
    TDD: (888)205-3223
    Internet: http://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/GARD/

    Irish Heart Foundation
    4 Clyde Road
    Ballsbridge
    Dublin, 4
    Ireland
    Tel: 35316685001
    Fax: 35316685896
    Email: info@irishheart.ie
    Internet: http://www.irishheart.ie

    For a Complete Report:

    This is an abstract of a report from the National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD). A copy of the complete report can be downloaded free from the NORD website for registered users. The complete report contains additional information including symptoms, causes, affected population, related disorders, standard and investigational therapies (if available), and references from medical literature. For a full-text version of this topic, go to www.rarediseases.org and click on Rare Disease Database under "Rare Disease Information".

    The information provided in this report is not intended for diagnostic purposes. It is provided for informational purposes only. NORD recommends that affected individuals seek the advice or counsel of their own personal physicians.

    It is possible that the title of this topic is not the name you selected. Please check the Synonyms listing to find the alternate name(s) and Disorder Subdivision(s) covered by this report

    This disease entry is based upon medical information available through the date at the end of the topic. Since NORD's resources are limited, it is not possible to keep every entry in the Rare Disease Database completely current and accurate. Please check with the agencies listed in the Resources section for the most current information about this disorder.

    For additional information and assistance about rare disorders, please contact the National Organization for Rare Disorders at P.O. Box 1968, Danbury, CT 06813-1968; phone (203) 744-0100; web site www.rarediseases.org or email orphan@rarediseases.org

    Last Updated: 2/7/2013
    Copyright 2003, 2010, 2013 National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc.

    WebMD Medical Reference from the National Organization for Rare Disorders

    Last Updated: May 28, 2015
    This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.

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