Skip to content

Quiz: Myths and Facts About Your Heart Health

  1 of  
Current Score:  
Loading..Please Wait
slide image

To stay heart-healthy, exercise for 1 straight hour every day.

slide image

To stay heart-healthy, exercise for 1 straight hour every day.

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

Being physically active is important for your heart, but you don't have to carve out an hour every day to do it. The American Heart Association suggests at least 30 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity at least 5 days a week. Or you can do at least 25 minutes of more vigorous activity 3 days a week.

That can be anything like walking, swimming, or biking. You can break it up into 10 or 15 minutes here and there. The goal is just that you move.

slide image

Margarine is better for your heart than butter.

slide image

Margarine is better for your heart than butter.

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

Butter has a lot of saturated fat and some trans fat, which are unhealthy for your heart. But some hard margarines have even more unhealthy trans fats. Look to make sure they don't have trans fats. Better yet? Try brushing olive oil on your toast or bagel. It's a tasty, healthier choice.

During a heart attack, your heart stops beating.

During a heart attack, your heart stops beating.

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

During a heart attack, the heart is almost always still beating but blood supply to it is blocked. That cuts off the heart's oxygen supply, which can injure the heart. When your heart suddenly stops beating, it's called "cardiac arrest."

Fiber can lower your cholesterol.

Fiber can lower your cholesterol.

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

Fiber comes from whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and beans and other legumes. As part of a healthy diet, it can help lower your cholesterol and may lessen your chances of getting heart disease. The best foods for fiber are oats, some fruits and veggies (like raspberries and peas), and dried beans. You can also take supplements. But getting fiber through food is usually a better choice because you also get all the great nutrients that come with them.

Heart disease kills more men than women.

Heart disease kills more men than women.

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

Men tend to get heart disease earlier in life than women, but after menopause, women catch up. According to the American Heart Association, in 2010, more women died of heart disease (400,332) than men (387,318).

Jaw or back pain could be a sign of a heart attack.

Jaw or back pain could be a sign of a heart attack.

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

Although the most common sign of a heart attack is chest pain or discomfort, it's not always one of the symptoms. You might have shortness of breath, nausea, sweating, or feel lightheaded. Sometimes women especially could have pain or discomfort in other parts of the body -- like the back or jaw.

You get high cholesterol just because of what you eat.

You get high cholesterol just because of what you eat.

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

There are lots of things that can impact your cholesterol. One of the main ones is your genes. If your parents or grandparents had high levels, there's a good chance you could, too. Despite your genes, diet does matter. It's best to limit foods with cholesterol, saturated fats, and trans fats. That means try to cut back on fatty meats, full-fat dairy products, and deep-fried and processed foods.

About 1 in 10 Americans have some sort of heart disease.

About 1 in 10 Americans have some sort of heart disease.

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

According to the American Heart Association, nearly 86 million Americans -- more than 1 in 4 Americans -- have some type of heart disease. That includes heart attack, stroke, high blood pressure, and chest pain.

Cut your salt and cut your heart risk.

Cut your salt and cut your heart risk.

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

High-sodium diets have been tied to high blood pressure, as well as heart disease and stroke. So stash the salt shaker, but know that sodium comes mostly from processed foods and restaurants foods -- not the salt shaker. When reading food labels, know that adults shouldn't have more than 1,500 milligram of sodium each day.

Low-dose aspirin can help you avoid another heart attack.

Low-dose aspirin can help you avoid another heart attack.

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

The American Heart Association recommends you take a daily low-dose aspirin if you're at high risk of a heart attack or if you've already had a heart attack or stroke. But don't take it without talking to your doctor first. Aspirin helps prevent blood clots, and clots cause most heart attacks and some strokes.

Being obese is the biggest risk factor for heart disease.

Being obese is the biggest risk factor for heart disease.

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

Sitting on your couch may be the worst thing you can do for your heart. According to a CDC report, 40% of Americans are at risk for heart disease because they're inactive. Close behind, 34% are at risk due to obesity. The other most important risk factors are uncontrolled high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and smoking.

Heart disease kills more women than breast cancer.

Heart disease kills more women than breast cancer.

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

Heart disease is the No. 1 killer of women in the United States, killing more women than all forms of cancer combined. One in three women die of heart disease, while one in 31 die of breast cancer.

Eat only fat-free foods to protect your heart.

Eat only fat-free foods to protect your heart.

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

Fat-free was once the biggest food trend, but now it's more important that you eat everything in moderation. Studies show, for example, that people who drank full-fat dairy had no higher risk of heart disease than those who didn't. And foods that are labeled "fat-free" can still have lots of salt or sugar. Too much of that can be bad for your heart. Just be smart and always limit your portions.

To lower chances of heart disease, even non-drinkers should drink red wine.

To lower chances of heart disease, even non-drinkers should drink red wine.

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

Many recent studies have suggested that red wine may lower the risk of getting heart disease. If you drink, the American Heart Association suggests no more than two drinks a day for men and one for women. If you don't drink, don't start. The benefits don't outweigh the negative health risks of alcohol -- including high blood pressure, stroke, and obesity.

Eat fish at least twice a week for a healthy heart.

Eat fish at least twice a week for a healthy heart.

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

The American Heart Association recommends eating fish -- especially fatty fish like salmon and mackerel --  at least two times each week. Fish is a great source of heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids, plus it's not high in unhealthy saturated fat. If you don't like fish, talk to your doctor about taking omega 3 supplements.

Your Score:     You correctly answered   out of   questions.
Your Score:     You correctly answered   out of   questions.
results image

RESULTS: Great job! You sure are smart about your heart!

RESULTS: Not bad. You're pretty smart about keeping your heart healthy.

RESULTS: Take heart: Looks like you learned a lot and you can try again.

Today on WebMD

x-ray of human heart
A visual guide.
atrial fibrillation
Symptoms and causes.
 
heart rate graph
10 things to never do.
heart rate
Get the facts.
 
empty football helmet
Article
red wine
Video
 
eating blueberries
Article
Simple Steps to Lower Cholesterol
Slideshow
 
Inside A Heart Attack
SLIDESHOW
Omega 3 Sources
SLIDESHOW
 
Salt Shockers
SLIDESHOW
lowering blood pressure
SLIDESHOW