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Cardiac Rehabilitation - Phases of Cardiac Rehab

Cardiac rehab is a program designed specifically for you and your medical needs. It includes exercise, lifestyle changes, education, and emotional support. It can help improve your health and enable you to live a more active life. Cardiac rehab can also help you return to work safely and in a timely manner.

You may start a cardiac rehab program while you are still in the hospital after having treatment for a heart attack or other heart problem, soon after leaving the hospital, or at any other time to help prevent future heart problems, improve the quality of your life, and make you healthier. Your doctor will give you an exercise prescription that gives you and your cardiac rehab team guidelines for the frequency, duration, and intensity of exercise. The prescription will be based on your medical condition and your fitness level.

How fast you recover depends on your age, your health, and whether you have other health conditions that may slow your recovery. A younger person without other health problems may improve more quickly than an older person who is in poor health. Depending on your condition and how you respond to rehab, you may stay in a certain phase or move back and forth among the various phases. There is no set length of time that you must stay in a specific phase.

Cardiac rehab has four phases. Your doctor will determine which phase is best for you to start your program.

Inpatient program: Phase I

Phase I takes place in the hospital after you have experienced a heart attack, heart surgery, or other major heart problem. Phase I of cardiac rehab usually includes:

  • Determining how well you can care for yourself (bathing, dressing, and grooming) after your heart attack or surgery.
  • Measuring your ability to exercise. Your doctor will probably want you to have an exercise test before you begin your cardiac rehab exercise program. This test will show what types of exercise are safe for you and how soon you can begin to exercise.
  • Identifying which daily activities, such as lifting, you can safely do.
  • Providing patient and family education about the lifestyle changes you need to make, such as eating healthy foods and quitting smoking. Changes in your diet may be difficult to make. But even small changes can help improve cholesterol levels and improve your health. For ideas that can help you get started, see:
    actionset.gif Heart Disease: Eating a Heart-Healthy Diet.
  • Doing light exercise, such as walking short distances several times a day and possibly beginning a weight-training program.
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