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Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery: Minimally Invasive Methods - Topic Overview

Standard coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery is very successful in improving blood flow to the heart. But the procedure is very invasive to your body for two major reasons:

  • It involves making a large chest incision to expose your heart and arteries.
  • It requires stopping your heart and connecting you to a heart-lung bypass machine that takes over the work of your heart and lungs.

Because of this level of invasiveness, the procedure can cause several complications. Surgeons have developed several new methods that minimize the invasiveness and risks involved with CABG surgery. But minimally invasive CABG surgery is not available everywhere. And minimally invasive CABG surgery is not right for everyone.

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Beating-heart surgery

Beating-heart surgery is different from the standard CABG surgery. During a standard CABG procedure, your heart will be stopped and you will be connected to a heart-lung bypass machine. Beating-heart surgery (BHS) is unique because the procedure is performed while your heart is still beating, without the heart-lung bypass machine.

There are two main types of beating-heart surgery (BHS), which is also called minimally invasive CABG surgery:

  • Minimally invasive direct coronary artery bypass (MIDCAB)
  • Off-pump coronary artery bypass (OPCAB)

MIDCAB

Minimally invasive direct coronary artery bypass (MIDCAB) surgery differs from traditional CABG surgery in two ways. First, the MIDCAB procedure does not use the heart-lung bypass machine. Second, your surgeon will cut several small incisions (thoracotomies) in your chest to access your coronary arteries instead of the one large incision (sternotomy) used in traditional CABG surgery. These smaller incisions expose only the sections of your arteries that require grafts, instead of your entire heart. As a result, you have a lower risk of infection. You also do not have the large scar associated with traditional CABG surgery.

The main disadvantage of MIDCAB is that it cannot be used to treat several diseased vessels, especially if arteries on both the left and right sides of the heart are blocked. The limited number of small incisions made using MIDCAB makes it difficult to treat more than two coronary arteries during the same surgery.

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