Skip to content
My WebMD Sign In, Sign Up

Heart Disease Health Center

Font Size

Heart Valve Replacement Surgery: Life After Surgery - Topic Overview

After you have recovered from your heart valve replacement surgery, you will probably feel better than you did before you had the surgery.

It may take several weeks for your recovery, including healing your incisions. Then you should be able to resume most of your normal activities.

Recommended Related to Heart Disease

Rein In the Rage: Anger and Heart Disease

If a caller upsets you, do you hurl the phone across the room? Do you curse and blast the horn furiously if the driver in front of you takes three seconds to notice the green light? An angry temperament can hurt more than relationships -- anger and heart disease may go hand in hand, according to experts. "You're talking about people who seem to experience high levels of anger very frequently," says Laura Kubzansky, PhD, MPH, an assistant professor at the Harvard School of Public Health who...

Read the Rein In the Rage: Anger and Heart Disease article > >

After surgery, you will have regular doctor visits to check your heart and your new valve. You will take blood thinning medicine to prevent blood clots after surgery. And you might need antibiotics to prevent infections.

Keep in mind that an artificial valve will not work as well as an undamaged natural valve. So even though your heart function is improved, it may not recover to completely normal levels. If your heart was already severely affected before your surgery, you may still have symptoms of heart disease.

Regular doctor visits

After surgery, you will have regular checkups so your doctor can check your heart and your heart valve.

It is important to know that you aren't cured after you have had a valve replacement. You still have a serious heart condition that must be monitored.

All artificial heart valves eventually wear out and need to be replaced. A mechanical valve will last 20 to 30 years. A tissue valve will last about 8 to 15 years.

Your doctor will check the new valve periodically for signs that it is wearing out. Your doctor will ask you how you are feeling and if you have any new symptoms or changes in symptoms. These symptoms are similar to those that signaled that the original valve was wearing out: a heart murmur and sometimes symptoms such as shortness of breath and fainting. These signs may be spotted during visits to your doctor.

You might have tests, such as an echocardiogram, to check how well your heart is working. Your doctor will also check for other heart problems.

Blood thinners

If you have a mechanical valve (made of plastic, metal, or cloth), you will need to take blood thinners (anticoagulants) such as warfarin (for example, Coumadin) for the rest of your life to keep blood clots from forming on your valve surfaces.

If you have a biological valve (made of animal or human tissue), you need to take anticoagulants for a few weeks or months after surgery while your body adapts to your new valve. Your doctor will tell you when you can stop taking anticoagulants.

You must be careful when using blood thinners, because there are risks associated with their use. The major risk is that your blood may become too thin. This means you will bruise more easily, bleed more heavily from minor injury, or even bleed spontaneously. You should visit your doctor regularly to have your blood clotting monitored.

Antibiotics

If you have an artificial valve, you may need to take antibiotics before you have certain dental or surgical procedures. The antibiotics help prevent an infection in your heart called endocarditis.

1

WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

Last Updated: November 02, 2011
This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
Next Article:

Heart Valve Replacement Surgery: Life After Surgery Topics

Today on WebMD

cholesterol lab test report
Article
Compressed heart
Article
 
heart rate graph
Article
Compressed heart
Article
 
empty football helmet
Article
Heart Valve
Video
 
eating blueberries
Article
Simple Steps to Lower Cholesterol
Slideshow
 
Inside A Heart Attack
SLIDESHOW
Omega 3 Sources
SLIDESHOW
 
Salt Shockers
SLIDESHOW
lowering blood pressure
SLIDESHOW