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Mitral Valve Regurgitation - When to Call a Doctor

Call 911 or other emergency services immediately if you or a person you are with has:

Call a doctor immediately if you have:

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  • Symptoms of heart failure, such as shortness of breath, fatigue, and swelling in the legs and feet.
  • Mitral valve regurgitation (MR) and are having symptoms of infection such as fever with no other obvious cause. Be alert for signs of infection if you have recently have had any dental, diagnostic, or surgical procedure.
  • Irregular heartbeats.
  • Fainting episodes.
  • Palpitations.
  • Shortness of breath.
  • A decreased ability to exercise at your usual level.
  • Excessive fatigue (without other explanation).

If you are coughing up blood, call a doctor immediately.

Watchful waiting

Watchful waiting is a wait-and-see approach. If you do not have symptoms of MR, your doctor will still want to see you every 6 to 12 months or as soon as you have symptoms for the first time. If your doctor has talked with you about what to do if you have symptoms, follow your doctor's instructions. Contact your doctor if your symptoms get worse.

Who to see

Health professionals who can evaluate symptoms that may be related to mitral valve regurgitation include:

They frequently can also order the tests needed for further evaluation of symptoms.

    This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http:// cancer .gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.

    WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

    Last Updated: March 12, 2014
    This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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