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Rheumatic Fever and Heart Problems - Topic Overview

Rheumatic fever is a bacterial infection that can cause problems with the heart's aortic and mitral valves.

Rheumatic fever is caused by certain strains of streptococcal bacteria. A strep throat infection that isn't properly treated can trigger rheumatic fever. Rheumatic fever can damage heart muscle and heart valves. Not all people who have rheumatic fever develop rheumatic heart disease.

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How does rheumatic fever damage the heart?

This infection causes swelling and muscle damage to the heart. It can cause heart valve leaflets to stick together, which narrows the opening of the valve. This narrowing prevents blood from moving through the heart normally.

If the aortic valve is narrowed, this problem is called aortic valve stenosis.

If the mitral valve is narrowed, this problem is called mitral valve stenosis.

Who is affected by rheumatic fever?

Rheumatic fever is rare in Canada, the United States, and western Europe. But it was fairly common until the 1950s. Widespread use of antibiotics to treat strep throat has greatly lowered the number of new cases of rheumatic fever.

Today, most rheumatic fever cases occur in developing countries, particularly Africa and southeast Asia.

Some people may develop a heart valve disease after having rheumatic fever as a child. It might take 30 to 40 years after a case of rheumatic fever for a valve problem to develop.

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WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

Last Updated: November 02, 2011
This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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