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Ventriculogram - Topic Overview

A ventriculogram is a test that shows images of your heart. The images show how well your heart is pumping. The pictures let your doctor check the health of the lower chambers of your heart, called ventricles.

This test can be done as a noninvasive test or as part of an invasive procedure.

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  • Noninvasive imaging test. You get an injection of dye into your blood. Then your doctor uses a special camera to see how well your heart is pumping blood.
  • Invasive procedure. This test is done as part of a cardiac catheterization. Your doctor inserts a thin, flexible catheter into your heart. Your doctor uses the catheter to inject dye into your heart. This dye makes the inside of your heart show up on an X-ray. Then your doctor can see how well your heart is pumping.

A ventriculogram can show:

  • The movement of your heart muscle as your ventricles fill and pump blood.
  • The size of your ventricles.
  • How efficiently your left ventricle pumps blood (ejection fraction).
  • How well blood flows through your heart valves (aortic and mitral valves).

    This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http:// cancer .gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.

    WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

    Last Updated: March 12, 2014
    This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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