Skip to content

Heart Health Center

Font Size

Everyday Noise Levels May Affect the Heart

Even not-so-loud sounds seemed to raise people's heart rate in small study

continued...

Louder noise, meanwhile, seemed to rev up the sympathetic nervous system -- the branch that boosts heart rate, constricts blood vessels and otherwise sends us into "fight or flight" mode.

The value of the findings is that they suggest a biological reason for why noise has been linked to ill heart effects, said Alexandra Schneider, one of the researchers in the Institute of Epidemiology at Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, in Germany, who worked on the study.

"Our main focus was to find a possible mechanism that could be responsible for the observed health effects in other studies," Schneider said.

The study was not designed to offer people advice on how much noise is "bad" for their hearts, she said.

Gan agreed. "This study is a first step in exploring the underlying biological mechanisms for the association between noise exposure and cardiovascular disease," he said. "We need more studies like this."

A big question, said study author Schneider, is whether the short-term effects of noise, repeated over time, ultimately affect heart health -- particularly for people who already have chronic medical conditions.

Although the study tied increased noise exposure to a rise in heart rate, it did not establish a cause-and-effect relationship.

1|2

Today on WebMD

hdl letters stacked up
How to boost your ‘good’ cholesterol.
headache
Learn the causes.
 
Compressed heart
5 habits to change.
heart rate
What’s normal? What’s not?
 
Lower Cholesterol 02
QUIZ
Heart Foods Slideshow
Slideshow
 
Compressed heart
Article
doctor looking at xrays
Video
 
Heart Disease And Ed
SLIDESHOW
Lowering Cholesterol Slideshow
SLIDESHOW
 
lowering blood pressure
SLIDESHOW
Wide Awake For Heart Surgery
VIDEO
 

WebMD Special Sections